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One of the problems the institutional crisis of philosophy is facing in Romania is the difficulty of philosophy graduates to find a suitable place on the complex labor market. The article attempts to elucidate whether philosophy graduates subsequently teach what they study during their university education and to find solutions for a better integration on the labor market of these graduates. An important part of the article is dedicated to analyzing the institutional offer vis-à-vis the challenges that philosophy graduates face once they are attempting to find a job on the labor market. From our analysis we conclude that there is no direct connection between the diversity of jobs among philosophy graduates and the courses that they took during their university studies.
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... Employers tend to often have a negative perception concerning the outputs of the universities' activities -this applies to both research as well as the training of the students whose knowledge and abilities are not considered as relevant in light of the requirements of the labor market. This problem does not concern only public administration graduates (Frunza & Frunza, 2010). ...
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... At the same time, the conclusions emphasized by Sandu and Mihaela Frunză are true 33 : there is resistance on the part of professors and decision-makers to renew the educational curricula and syllabi. What is obvious is that in Romania, this resistance is less because of the crisis of humanities -as a matter of fact general in the Western educational system 34 -than because of the bureaucratic character of the Romanian society, politics and education. ...
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