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The importance and implication of genetic resources in agriculture

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The maintenance and preservation of biodiversity is going through the processes of conservation and restoration of disturbed ecosystems and habitats, as well as the preservation and recovery of species. Genetic diversity means the variety and total number of genes contained in plant and animal species and microorganisms. Genetic diversity is the basic unit of diversity, which is responsible for differences between individuals, populations and species. Genetic diversity is very important for the preservation of biodiversity and can be saved in several ways. Part of the germplasm is maintained through breeding programs as they evaluate germplasm stored and used as a source of needed diversity. The Convention on Biological Diversity is one of the most important international agreements to protect nature and conserve genetic resources. International treaties governing the use of genetic resources for food and agriculture are a way to ensure the conservation and sustainable use of plant resources for food and agriculture, and to regulate the rights of farmers.
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... Very good is development conservation of genetic resources ex situ in developing countries [6]. From this point of view, very important is also international agreements, the convention on biological diversity, to protect nature and conserve genetic resources [7]. ...
... Therefore it is very important to identify germplasm with high levels of the micronutrients in selection program to enhance the nutritional composition of species through the conventional plant breeding. Genetic diversity is imply the variability of species and can improve quality of cultivated plants (MILOSEVIC et al., 2010). Thus, it is important to assessment germplasm with high mineral concentration and application multivariate methods of analysis could be useful tool to selecting genotype among plant genetic resources which is a good source for comprehensive breeding program. ...
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Bozokalfa Kadri M., D. Esiyok, and B. Yagnur (2011): Use of multivariate analysis in mineral accumulation of rocket (eruca sativa) accessions.-Genetika, Vol 43, No. 3, 437-448. The leafy vegetables contain high amount of mineral elements and health promoting compound. To solve nutritional problems in diet and reduced malnutrition among human population selection of specific cultivar among species would be help increasing elemental delivery in the human diet. While rocket plant observes several nutritional compounds no significant efforts have been made for genetic diversity for mineral composition of rocket plant accessions using multivariate analyses technique. The objective of this work was to evaluate variability for mineral accumulation of rocket accessions revealed by multivariate analysis to use further breeding program for achieve improving cultivar in targeting high nutrient concentration. A total twelve mineral element and twenty-three E. sativa accessions were investigated and considerable variation were observed in the most of concentration the principal component analysis explained that 77.67% of total variation accounted for four PC axis. Rocket accessions were classifies into three groups and present outcomes of experiments revealed that the first three principal components were highly valid to classify the examined accessions and separating mineral accumulations. Significant differences exhibited in mineral concentration among examined rocket accessions and the result could allow selecting those genotypes with higher elements.
... INTRODUCTION Traditional cultivars are important source of genetic variability and adaptability (HAMMER et al, 2003), and broad genetic diversity is basis for successful breeding process and adaptation to environmental conditions (VASIĆ et al., 2009), as well as pathogens. Disappearance of old cultivars has been dramatically accelerated in last five to six decades (MILOŠEVIĆ et al., 2010). Large areas have been planted with single genotype of newly created cultivars (BOROJEVIĆ, 1981), especially of most cultivated species. ...
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