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In vivo Anti-inflammatory and in vitro Antioxidant Activities of Peperomia pellucida

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Peperomia pellucida is widely used in the traditional medicine such as in the treatment of inflammation, gout, arthritis and wound healing. The present study was performed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol extracts of P. pellucida . The carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema method was performed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect in vivo and the determination of free radical scavenging activity method was carried out to assess the antioxidant effect in vitro . For the anti-inflammatory activity, 1000 mg kg<SUP>-1</SUP> of petroleum ether extract significantly reduced carrageenan-induced hind paw edema (p<0.05) compared with the control (p<0.01). However, there was no significant anti-inflammatory activity for chloroform and methanol extracts. The antioxidant effect was evaluated by determining the free radical scavenging activity of the three extracts. The total phenol content was determined for the methanol extract (6.93%) that showed the strongest free radical scavenging activity (0.083 mg mL<SUP>-1</SUP> ±0.008). Petroleum ether and chloroform showed low free radical scavenging activity compared to methanol extract. The results obtained from this study suggest that this plant is a good natural source for anti-inflammatory and antioxidant therapy.
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... Journal of Science Research (2012) Vol. 11 (1): [31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42][43] 34 ...
... A 3.94 mg of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl radical (DPPH), a stable radical was dissolved in methanol (100ml) to give a 100 µm solution. To 3.0 ml of the methanolic solutions of DPPH was added 0.5 ml of each of the fractions with doses ranging from 1.0 mg/ml to 0.0625 mg/ml [27,[32][33]. The decrease in absorption at 517 nm of DPPH was measured 10 minutes later. ...
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... They are associated with the analgesic, antiinflammatory, antipyretic, bactericidal, and fungicidal potential of the species [20]. Other research also shows that P. pellucida may be a good natural source of antioxidants by suppressing oxidative stress in various metabolic diseases [21,22]. ...
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... 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl radical (3.94 mg), a stable radical was dissolved in methanol (100 ml) to give a 100 µm solution. To 3.0 ml of the methanolic solutions of DPPH was added 0.5 ml of each of the bulked fractions with doses ranging from 1.0 mg/ml to 62.5 µg/ml (Gulcin et al., 2002;Mutee et al., 2010;Oloyede et al., 2010b). The decrease in absorption at 517 nm of DPPH was measured 10 minutes later. ...
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... 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl radical (3.94 mg), a stable radical was dissolved in methanol (100ml) to give a 100 µm solution. To 3.0 ml of the methanolic solutions of DPPH was added 0.5 ml of each of the bulked fractions with doses ranging from 0.0625 mg/ml to 1.0mg/ml (Gulcin et al, 2002; Koleva et al, 2002; Mutee et al, 2010; b Oloyede et al, 2010). The decrease in absorption at 517 nm of DPPH using UV-Visible spectrophotometer was measured 10 minutes later. ...
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... A 3.94 mg of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl radical (DPPH), a stable radical was dissolved in methanol (100 ml) to give a 100 µM solution. To 3.0 ml of the methanolic solutions of DPPH was added 0.5 ml of each of the fractions with doses ranging from 1.0 to 0.0625 mg/ml (Gulcin et al., 2002;Mutee et al., 2010 and. The mixture was shaken well and left to stand for 10 minutes. ...
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... A 3.94 mg of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl radical (DPPH), a stable radical was dissolved in methanol (100ml) to give a 100 µM solution. To 3.0 ml of the methanolic solutions of DPPH was added 0.5 ml of each of the fractions with doses ranging from 1.0 mg/ml to 0.0625 mg/ml [3,8,10]. The decrease in absorption at 517 nm of DPPH was measured 10 minutes later. ...
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... A 3.94 mg of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl radical (DPPH), a stable radical was dissolved in methanol (100ml) to give a 100 µm solution. To 3.0 ml of the methanolic solutions of DPPH was added 0.5 ml of each of the fractions with doses ranging from 1.0 mg/ml to 0.0625 mg/ml [19,31,35]. The decrease in absorption at 517 nm of DPPH was measured 10 minutes later. ...
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The Chemistry inside Spices and Herbs: Research and Development brings comprehensive information about the chemistry of spices and herbs with a focus on recent research in this field. The book is an extensive 2-part collection of 20 chapters contributed by experts in phytochemistry with the aim to give the reader deep knowledge about phytochemical constituents in herbal plants and their benefits. The contents include reviews on the biochemistry and biotechnology of spices and herbs, herbal medicines, biologically active compounds and their role in therapeutics among other topics. Chapters which highlight natural drugs and their role in different diseases and special plants of clinical significance are also included. Part II continues from the previous part with chapters on the treatment of skin diseases and oral problems. This part focuses on clinically important herbs such as turmeric, fenugreek, ashwagandha (Indian winter cherry), basil, Terminalia chebula (black myrobalan). In terms of phytochemicals, this part presents chapters that cover resveratrol, piperine and circumin.
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