Article

El método de las necesidades básicas insatisfechas (NBI) y sus aplicaciones en América Latina

03/2001; 7.
Source: RePEc

ABSTRACT

En América Latina, el método de las Necesidades Básicas Insatisfechas (NBI)ha significado un importante aporte para la identificación de ciertas carencias críticas de la población y la caracterización de la pobreza. En la presente nota se hace una revisión de las principales características de dicho método, tanto en su forma más generalizada de aplicación como en las variantes propuestas en años recientes. Adicionalmente, se incluye un resumen de los indicadores utilizados en algunos mapas de pobreza construidos en un gran número de países de la región. Con base en la síntesis de las ventajas y desventajas del método NBI contenidas en el documento, las conclusiones del mismo apuntan a destacar especialmente su utilidad en cuanto instrumento de caracterización de la población en términos de la insatisfacción de determinadas necesidades básicas, más que como una metodología de medición de la pobreza propiamente tal.

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Available from: Xavier Mancero, Dec 29, 2014
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    • "In the early 1980s the U.N. Economic Commission for Latin America (ECLAC) developed a framework (index) of Unsatisfied Basic Needs (UBN), Indice de Necesidades Básicas Insatisfechas, designed to measure nonmonetary dimensions of poverty (Feres and Mancero, 2001a). The UBN framework was inspired by Amartya Sen's seminal work on the measurement of poverty and living standards (Sen, 1976; 1984), but it was developed as an index for the pragmatic reason that it uses census data to measure poverty, independent of income (Feres and Mancero, 2001a). The development of the UBN index was based on multidimensional poverty mapping first done in Chile (Kast Rist and Silva, 1975). "
    Dataset: MR9

    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2016
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    • "In addition to proposing a model to identify the poor and aggregate their characteristics, they specify several functional forms to account for different relationships of complementarity or substitution between the dimensions or indicators. Their model differs from previous aggregated multiple-dimension indicators like the 5 The UBN approach used census data to evaluate the level of deprivation on: (i) housing (construction materials and overcrowding), (ii) access water and sanitation; (iii) school attendance and years of education of the household head; and (iv) rate of demographic dependency (Feres and Mancero 2001). This methodology utilized a union approach to determine poverty, meaning that if a person or household was deprived in one of the indicators, it was identified as poor. "
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    ABSTRACT: Using the latest nationally representative household survey for Chile, this paper empirically assesses multidimensional poverty both at the national and subnational level. Based on the Alkire-Foster method and focusing on four dimensions of well-being –education, health, income and living standard– this study estimates the level and depth of multidimensional poverty for Chile in 2011. At national level, the results show that fewer individuals are subject to multidimensional poverty compared to the number of poor people estimated using the national income poverty line, however, large variance is found at the regional level, some regions present higher levels of multidimensional poverty than income poverty. Nonetheless, multidimensional poverty at the regional level appears to be varied, both in terms of prevalence and its nature. The multidimensional nature of this methodology provides a deeper understanding of poverty and deprivation, thus it complements income poverty estimates by informing policymakers about the joint distribution of several deprivations. This information can be used to better design and target poverty alleviation programs, as well as better allocate resources at the regional and local level.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014
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    • "In the early 1980s the U.N. Economic Commission for Latin America (ECLAC) developed a framework (index) of Unsatisfied Basic Needs (UBN), Indice de Necesidades Básicas Insatisfechas, designed to measure nonmonetary dimensions of poverty (Feres and Mancero, 2001a). The UBN framework was inspired by Amartya Sen's seminal work on the measurement of poverty and living standards (Sen, 1976; 1984), but it was developed as an index for the pragmatic reason that it uses census data to measure poverty, independent of income (Feres and Mancero, 2001a). The development of the UBN index was based on multidimensional poverty mapping first done in Chile (Kast Rist and Silva, 1975). "
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    ABSTRACT: The development of the DHS Wealth Index more than a decade ago provided the opportunity to analyze economic status inequalities beyond those of educational attainment, occupation, residence, and ethnic group. However, the DHS wealth index is survey-specific and as such refers to a particular point in time, limiting comparative and trend analyses involving economic status. This report describes the methodology of the Comparative Wealth Index (CWI), a way to make the standard DHS Wealth Index comparable across surveys and time which allows direct comparison of economic status levels. In the report CWI has been computed for 172 DHS surveys conducted between 1990 and 2012. Calculations of means and standard deviations of the CWI for each survey show that the CWI comports well with per capita income measures for countries and for regions. The report illustrates use of the CWI in analyses of indicators of child mortality, fertility, maternal health care, and child nutritional status and highlights the importance of considering absolute levels of wealth when comparing national survey data. The Comparative Wealth Index does not replace the original DHS Wealth Index but adds an additional dimension for comparative and trend analysis, one that can be used to sort out the effects of health programs from the effects of changes in economic status of the population.
    Full-text · Technical Report · Feb 2014
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