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The objective of the pilot study was to test the effect of inhaling 99.5% oxygen on recovery. The source of concentrated oxygen was O-PUR (Oxyfit). Research subjects completed two thirty-second Wingate tests at an interval of ten minutes, and in the interval between the tests the subjects inhaled either oxygen or a placebo in random order. This procedure was then repeated. The pilot study revealed a significantly (p<0.03) smaller performance drop in the second Wingate test following the inhalation of 99.5% oxygen when compared with the placebo. The results of the study indicate that inhaling concentrated oxygen may have a positive effect on short-term recovery processes.
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... Inhalation of 30% oxygen increases minute ventilation by 21% (Chung et al., 2008). Inhaling oxygen for 2 min causes transient hyperoxia that lasts approximately for six minutes (Suchý et al., 2010). Inhaling oxygen-enriched air increases exercise performance. ...
... Most of the previous studies have been performed in laboratory settings where participants inhaled oxygen during exercise (Chung et al., 2006;Han et al., 2011;Peltonen et al., 1995;Prieur et al., 1998;Pupiš et al., 2010). Only few studies described the utilization of oxygen before exercise (Chung et al., 2006;Suchý et al., 2010). In this study, we attempted to create settings that would resemble the possible use of oxygen in sports, using metal canisters containing 5 L of oxygen in concentrations ranging from 95 to 99.5%, which are now commercially available. ...
... By decreasing both the respiratory rate and the HR, we could increase the frequency and the length of effort. In another study (Suchý et al., 2010), athletes inhaled 30% oxygen during rest intervals between maximum effort exercise on a cycloergometer. ...
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Recently, it has been reported that tear osmolarity (Tosm) is correlated with plasma osmolarity and will increase during exertion. We aimed to assess whether inhaling oxygen-enriched air between exercises could significantly change the Tosm value. Thirty men aged 24.9 years were included in the study. A cycloergometer was used to perform the exercise protocol. We recorded the participants’ Tosm (mOsm/L), heart rate (HR, beats/minute), oxygen saturation, and blood pressure values. After the first exhaustive exercise (T1), participants inhaled oxygen in the experimental group and a placebo in the control group. After the second exercise (T2), another set of measurements was obtained. The Tosm value before exercise was 297.4 ± 1.21 and 296.53 ± 1.11 mOsm/L (p = 0.61718) and the HR was 72.6 ± 2.59 and 73 ± 2.59 beats/minute (p = 0.39949) in the study and the control group, respectively. At T1, Tosm was 303.67 ± 1.25 and 302.2 ± 1.25 mOsm/L (p = 0.41286) and the HR reached 178.04 ± 2.60 and 176.4 ± 2.60 beats/minute (p = 0.65832), respectively. At T2, Tosm in the study group reached 305.73 ± 0.86 mOsm/L (correlation with the use of oxygen: r = −0.3818), and in the control group, it was 308.4 ± 0.86 mOsm/L (p = 0.0373), while the HR reached 172.20 ± 2.53 beats/minute in the study group and 178.2 ± 2.53 beats/minute in the control group (p = 0.057). It was concluded that inhaling oxygen before and after exercise could increase the rate of recovery after exhaustive exercise.
... In other works the influence of hyperoxia on the tolerance for physical activity, oxygen consumption during performance, oxidative metabolism, lactate response during and after exertion and the partial pressure of oxygen were demonstrated [1]. Substantially less work has been published examining the influence of hyperoxia on recovery following physical exertion [11]. ...
... The results confirm the positive influence of hyperoxia on accelerating regeneration in a repeated model of specific basketball exercise. On the basis of our measurements and the positive results of analogous studies, 11,12,15,16,18,28 we believe it would be appropriate to use this permitted way of improving performance between repeated short-term anaerobic exercise to a greater extent in sport than is presently the case. The influence of hyperoxia on fine motor skills was not confirmed, but that may be due to the low reliability of the test chosen. ...
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Aim. Aim of the study was to verify the influence of the short-term repeated inhalation of air with higher concentration of oxygen (FiO2=30%) on regeneration and fine motor skills after repeated anaerobic exercise in basketball. Methods. Research subjects (N.=10) completed two test sessions with a three-day interval in between them. Each session covered two identical basketball tests at maximal intensity lasting two minutes. In the pause between the tests the research subjects intermittently inhaled air with higher concentration of oxygen or placebo in random order. Time, success rate and number of shots at the basket were recorded during the sessions, as were regeneration processes (changes in lactate concentrations and heart rate). Results. The results confirmed, with both statistical (P<0.05) and substantive significance, the positive influence of inhaling air with higher concentration of oxygen on reducing the heart rate (on average by 10% immediately after the test and by 22.5% 390 seconds after completing the test) and the lactate level (on average by 4.7% and 3.2% during exercise in the first and second test respectively and by 5% and 4.2% respectively at rest). We did not demonstrate (P<0.05) the influence of inhaling concentrated oxygen on the success rate of shots at the basket. Conclusion. The data acquired confirm the positive influence of short-term hyperoxia on accelerating regeneration in repeated model-specific basketball exercise, but the influence on fine motor skills was not established.
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Wanneer tijdens lichamelijke inspanning lucht met extra zuurstof (hyperoxische lucht) wordt ingeademd, kan er meer vermogen worden geleverd. Zorgt dit echter ook voor een prestatieverbetering op de lange termijn onder normale omstandigheden? En kan het vooraf inademen van hyperoxische lucht de daaropvolgende sportprestatie ook verbeteren?
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Hyperoxia, or an increase in inspired oxygen concentration, has been used by scientists to examine exercise metabolism and physical work capacity. It is apparent that hyperoxia increases VO2max and exercise tolerance due to an increase in O2 supply to contracting muscle. Furthermore, hyperoxia increases PaO2, which may promote an enhanced diffusion of O2 in skeletal muscle. Compared to normoxia, hyperoxia may reduce PCr degradation during the metabolic transient, attenuating the magnitude of cellular disturbance characteristic of near-maximal to maximal exercise. These aforementioned increases in exercise tolerance during hyperoxia are not due to alterations in ventilation, lactate (La-), or acid/base balance in hyperoxia, as previous data report no change in these parameters compared to normoxia. In addition, it is recommended researchers take special precautions to ensure the accuracy of gas exchange data in hyperoxia.
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To determine whether supplemental oxygen following exercise hastens recovery or enhances subsequent performance we evaluated its effectiveness in 13 male athletes. The exercise periods consisted of two 5-min submaximal efforts on a treadmill ergometer followed by a single bout to exhaustion. Intervals of exercise were separated by a 4-min recovery period during which the subject breathed either 1) room air, 2) 100% oxygen, or 3) 2 min of 100% oxygen followed by 2 min of room air on three nonconsecutive days. We found that breathing 100% oxygen produced no significant difference on the recovery kinetics of minute ventilation or heart rate, or improvement in subsequent performance as measured by duration of exercise (3.33 +/- 0.04 min, air vs 3.46 +/- 0.03, oxygen) and peak VO2 (59.9 +/- 2.2 ml.kg-1.min-1, air vs 54.5 +/- 2.2, oxygen). In addition, the perceived magnitude of exertion estimated by the Borg scale was no different during oxygen breathing. These findings offer no support for the use of supplemental oxygen in athletic events requiring short intervals of submaximal or maximal exertion.
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The Wingate anaerobic test was developed at the Department of Research and Sport Medicine of the Wingate Institute for Physical Education and Sport, Israel, during the mid- and late 1970s. Since the introduction in 1974 of its prototype (Ayalon et al. 1974), the Wingate anaerobic test has been used in various laboratories, both as a test that assesses anaerobic performance and as a standardised task that can help analyse responses to supramaximal exercise. The test was designed to be simple to administer, without the need for particularly skilled personnel; inexpensive; used with commonly available equipment, such as the Monark or similar mechanical cycle ergometers; non-invasive; measure muscle performance rather than indirect (biochemical or physiological) variables; feasible for administration to a wide spectrum of the population, including young children and the physically disabled; and, on the assumption that anaerobic performance is a local rather than a systemic characteristic, the test should be applicable to the upper and lower limbs alike. In addition, the test should qualify as objective, reliable, valid, sensitive to improvement or deterioration in anaerobic performance, and specific in reflecting anaerobic performance rather than fitness in general. The new anaerobic test was not designed to be used for the study of basic issues of muscle contractility and muscle fatigue, nor to replace biochemical or histochemical analyses of anaerobic metabolism. The purpose of this article is to review and update some characteristics of the Wingate anaerobic test and the gradual evolution in protocols and interpretation of results. Emphasis will be given to the test's reliability and validity. Data will be presented, based on published and unpublished observations from the author's laboratories at the Wingate Institute and McMaster University, as well as on findings from other laboratories. This review does not analyse all aspects of the Wingate anaerobic test. Some methodological issues have been omitted, as well as issues related to the sensitivity, specificity and applicability of the test; nor does the review include discussion of normative data.