Article

Elucidation of the decomposition pathways of protonated and deprotonated estrone ions: Application to the identification of photolysis products

French National Centre for Scientific Research, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry (Impact Factor: 2.25). 10/2010; 24(20):2999-3010. DOI: 10.1002/rcm.4722
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

With the future aim of elucidating the unknown structures of estrogen degradation products, we characterized the dissociation pathways of protonated estrone (E1) under collisional activation in liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) experiments employing a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Positive ion and negative ion modes give information on the protonated and deprotonated molecules and their product ions. The mass spectra of estrone methyl ether (CH(3)-E1) and estrone-d(4) (E1-d(4)) were compared with that of E1 in order (i) to elucidate the dissociation mechanisms of protonated and deprotonated molecules and (ii) to propose likely structures for each product ions. The positive ion acquisition mode yielded more fragmentation. The mass spectra of E1 were compared with those of estradiol (E2), estriol (E3) and 17-ethynylestradiol (EE2). This comparison allowed the identification of marker ions for each ring of the estrogenic structure. Accurate mass measurements have been carried out for all the identified ions. The resulting ions revealed to be useful for the characterization of structural modifications induced by photolysis on each ring of the estrone molecule. These results are very promising for the determination of new metabolites in the environment.

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Available from: Stéphane Bouchonnet, Jan 23, 2015
    • "Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have become growing concerns due to their detrimental effects on the human and animal endocrine systems (Bourcier et al., 2010). These chemicals include a wide range of compounds such as some pesticides, phthalates, alkylphenols, natural or synthetic estrogens, and pharmaceuticals (Stuart et al., 2005). "
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    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Environmental Chemistry
    • "Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have become growing concerns due to their detrimental effects on the human and animal endocrine systems (Bourcier et al., 2010). These chemicals include a wide range of compounds such as some pesticides, phthalates, alkylphenols, natural or synthetic estrogens, and pharmaceuticals (Stuart et al., 2005). "

    No preview · Article · Nov 2007 · Chemosphere
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    No preview · Article · Apr 2012 · Chemosphere
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