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Microneedling with Dermaroller

Authors:

Abstract

Microneedling with dermaroller is a new treatment modality for the treatment of scars, especially acne scars, stretch marks, wrinkles, and for facial rejuvenation. It is a simple and relatively cheap modality that also can be used for transdermal drug delivery.
Journal of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery - Jul-Dec 2009, Volume 2, Issue 2
110
Satish Doddaballapur
Department of Dermatology, Sagar Hospitals, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
DOI: 10.4103/0974-2077.58529
Address for correspondence:
Dr. Satish Doddaballapur, Consultant Dermatologist, Sagar Hospitals, Bangalore, India. E-mail: satishlakshmi@gmail.com
rEsidEnts’ pagE
introDuction
Dermaroller has recently attained popularity as a
simple means of treating scars, particularly acne scars.
It can be used safely in a dermatologist’s clinic by any
dermatologist with minimum training. This article
describes salient features of this modality.
history
Important milestones in the development of
microneedling are as follows:
1995-Orentreich and Orentreich described subcision
or dermal needling for scars[1]
1997-Camirand and Doucet described needle
dermabrasion using a “tattoo pistol” to treat scars[2]
2006-Fernandes developed percutaneous collagen
induction therapy with the dermaroller[3]
Dermaroller-the instrument
The standard dermaroller used for acne scars is a drum-
shaped roller studded with 192ne microneedles in eight
rows, 0.5-1.5 mm in length and 0.1 mm in diameter. The
microneedles are synthesized by reactive ion etching
techniques on silicon or medical-grade stainless steel.
The instrument is presterilized by gamma irradiation.
Medical dermarollers are for single use only.
the principle-collagen inDuction
therapy
The medical dermaroller needles are 0.5-1.5 mm in length.
During treatment, the needles pierce the stratum corneum
and create microconduits (holes) without damaging the
epidermis. It has been shown that rolling with a dermaroller
(192 needles, 200 mm length and 70 mm diameter) over an
area for 15 times will result in approximately 250 holes/ cm2.
Microneedling leads to the release of growth factors
which stimulate the formation of new collagen (natural
collagen) and elastin in the papillary dermis. In addition,
new capillaries are formed—this neovascularisation and
neocollagenesis following treatment leads to reduction
of scars.[4-6] The procedure is therefore aptly called
“percutaneous collagen induction therapy” and has also
been used in the treatment of photoageing.
Dermaroller for acne scars - the
proceDure
Microneedling is a simple ofce-based procedure. The area
to be treated is anesthetized with topical anesthesia for
45 minutes to one hour. After preparation of the area, rolling
is done 15-20 times in horizontal, vertical, and oblique
directions; Petechiae or pin-point bleeding which occurs is
easily controlled. After treatment, the area is wetted with
saline pads. The entire procedure lasts for 15 to 20 minutes,
depending on the extent of the area to be treated.
A minimum of six weeks is recommended between two
treatments as it takes that long for new natural collagen
to form. Three to four treatments may be needed for
moderate acne scars.
post-proceDure care
Microneedling is well tolerated by patients but erythema
Microneedling with dermaroller is a new treatment modality for the treatment of scars, especially acne scars, stretch
marks, wrinkles, and for facial rejuvenation. It is a simple and relatively cheap modality that also can be used for
transdermal drug delivery.
keyWorDs: Dermaroller, microneedling, scars
Microneedling with Dermaroller
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Journal of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery - Jul-Dec 2009, Volume 2, Issue 2 111
Satish: Microneedling with dermaroller
may be seen after treatment, lasting for 2-3 days.
Photoprotection for a week is advised as a routine and
local antibiotic creams may be prescribed. The patients
can go back to work the very next day.
Apart from erythema, no other side effects have
been reported. As the microholes close immediately,
postoperative infections do not occur. The procedure
is well tolerated and well accepted by the patients,
is cost-effective, can be done on all skin types and
on areas not suitable for peeling or laser resurfacing,
such as near eyes. Microneedling with dermaroller
can be combined with other acne scar treatments like
subcision, chemical peels, microdermabrasion, and
fractional resurfacing, thus maximizing the benets
to the patients.
home-care Dermarollers anD Derma
stamp
Home-Care dermarollers less than 0.15 mm in length
are available for transdermal delivery of substances
like lipopeptides and other anti-ageing products. They
can be used twice a week for up to one hundred times.
After use, the rollers have to be cleaned in hot tap
water and shaken dry. Peptide-based roller cleansers
are available.
Miniature versions of the dermaroller called derma-
stamps have been developed. They are used for
localized scars, eg. varicella scars and their needles
are 2 mm in length with a diameter of only 0.12 mm.
The procedure with the derma-stamp can be performed
in two minutes.
practical tips
1. Use good quality instruments—there are many
instruments from different companies; using poor
instruments may lead to breakage of needles in the
skin.
2. Counsel the patient that multiple sessions may be
needed.
3. Other treatments such as subcision, punch elevation
may need to be combined for optimal results in acne
scars.
4. Application of EMLA cream anesthesia can
prevent procedure pain and help in performing the
procedure properly.
5. Allow an interval of 4-6 weeks between the
procedures to get good results.
references
1. Orentreich DS, Orentreich N. Subcutaneous incisionless (subcision)
surgery for the correction of depressed scars and wrinkles. Dermatol
Surg 1995;21:6543-9.
2. Camirand A, Doucet J. Needle dermabrasion. Aesthet Plast Surg
1997;21:48-51.
3. Fernandes D. Minimally invasive percutaneous collagen induction. Oral
Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2006;17:51-63.
4. Aust MC, Fernandes D, Kolokythas P, Kaplan HM, Vogt PM. Percutaneous
collagen induction therapy: An alternative treatment for scars, wrinkles
and skin laxity. Plast Reconstr Surg 2008;21:1421-9.
5. Fernandes D, Signorini M. Combating photoaging with percutaneous
collagen induction. Clin Dermatol 2008;26:192-9.
6. Aust MC, Reimers K, Repenning C, Stahl F, Jahn S, Guggenheim M, et al.
Percutaneous collagen induction: Minimally invasive skin rejuvenation
without risk of hyperpigmentation-fact or fiction. Plast Reconstr Surg
2008;122:1553-63.
Source of Support: Nil, Conict of Interest: None declared.
ACSI Fellowships
The ACSI announces availability of fellowships in dermatosurgery under the following experts:
Dr. Neeti Khunger, New Delhi
Dr. Narendra Patwardan and Sharad Mutalik, Pune
Dr. Venkataram Mysore, Venkat Charmalaya, Centre for Advanced Dermatology, Bengaluru
Interested members may apply with the following details:
Name, age, sex, address, telephone, e-mail id, qualication and centre in which they are interested with a copy
of their biodata.
All successful applicants should become members of the ACSI before start of fellowship and submit one
publication in JCAS during their fellowship. The application along with the CV may be sent to:
Dr. Kanwarjit Dhillon, at kanwarjit29@yahoo.co.in
or mysorevenkat@hotmail.com or someshgupta@hotmail.com
Announcement
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