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Effects of adjunct therapy of a proprietary herbo-chromium supplement in type 2 diabetes: A randomized clinical trial <sup>FNx01</sup>

Authors:
  • J. B. Roy State Ayurvedic Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, India

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Background: Chromium chelates/complexes are widely used as nutritional supplements to redress complications of type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) patients. However, most of these chelates could be susceptible to oxidation into toxic Cr(VI) state. Complexation of Cr (III) with gallo-ellagi tannoids produces a herbochromium supplement (HCrS) that maintains its Cr3+ oxidation state under oxidizing circumstances in vitro . It was tested with conventional oral hypoglycemic drugs [(oral antidiabetic drugs (OAD)] for its beneficial effects in T2DM patients. Objective: A randomized clinical study with three OADs with or without HCrS was carried out in T2DM patients to evaluate the efficacy of the HCrS supplement. Materials and Methods: 150 T2DM patients were randomized into six treatment groups. After 60 days of treatment, fasting blood glucose and post-prandial blood glucose (FBG and PPBG, respectively), HbA <sub>1c</sub> , HsCRP, oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL), and urinary microalbumin levels and other diabetic symptoms were evaluated. Statistical Analysis: Findings were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc pairwise comparisons of groups using the least significant difference method. Results: Better control of FBG and PPBG levels were observed in patients receiving HCrS (−12.4 to −16.6%) compared to placebo groups (−3.4 to −9.4%). There was a 5.5-7.4% decrease in HsCRP and LDL levels in patients receiving HCrS, which is better than placebo treated groups. Significant decrease in urinary microalbumin level was observed in patients receiving HCrS (−20.0 to −22.5%) compared to placebo groups (−7.8 to −11.6%). Significant decreases in diabetic symptoms were observed in patients receiving HCrS (−47.4 to −59.4%) compared to that observed in placebo groups (−18.0 to 34.0%). Conclusion: The findings indicate that HCrS with OAD improves overall diabetic complications within 2 months and may be useful in long-term therapy.
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