Article

A metacognitive approach to computer education for teachers: combining theory and practice for computer capability

School of Education Papers 01/2002;
Source: OAI

ABSTRACT

Training in the use of computers has become a major priority for pre-service and practicing teachers both nationally and internationally. However computer technology is evolving at such a rapid rate that, if an individual undertakes traditional directive-style training in how to use a particular piece of software, that knowledge is likely to be inadequate or out-of-date in a short period of time. This rate of change places immense strain on everyone involved with technology, no matter what their skill levels. Rather than focusing on developing competencies or specific skill sets, this paper proposes that the attention of computer professional development might be profitably be given to computer capability. Drawing on the findings of an action research undertaking with preservice teachers this paper describes a metacognitive approach to computer education which attempts to foster capable life-long computer learners. A range of theories which inform the approach are outlined including social cognitive theory, attribution theory, and learning style theory. The paper illustrates how a metacognitive approach can impact upon computer learners’ attitudes, values and beliefs.

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