Article

Effects of Long-Term Etanercept Treatment on Growth in Children With Selected Categories of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

Pediatric Rheumatology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA.
Arthritis & Rheumatology (Impact Factor: 7.76). 11/2010; 62(11):3259-64. DOI: 10.1002/art.27682
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To evaluate the effects of long-term etanercept treatment, with or without methotrexate, on growth in children with selected categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).
We conducted a 3-year, open-label, nonrandomized registry of 594 patients with polyarticular or systemic JIA treated with etanercept only, etanercept plus methotrexate, or methotrexate only. Height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) were assessed at baseline and at years 1, 2, and 3, using percentiles derived from US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention standardized growth charts.
Statistically significant increases in the mean height percentiles from baseline were observed in etanercept-treated patients at year 3 (4.8 percentile points) and in patients treated with etanercept plus methotrexate at years 1, 2, and 3 (2.4, 3.3, and 5.6 percentile points, respectively). Statistically significant increases from baseline in the mean weight percentiles were observed at years 1, 2, and 3 in both the etanercept group (7.4, 10.0, and 13.0 percentile points) and the etanercept-plus-methotrexate group (2.9, 6.9, and 8.4 percentile points, respectively). Statistically significant increases from baseline in the mean BMI percentiles were observed in both the etanercept group (range 9.6-13.8 percentile points) and the etanercept-plus-methotrexate group (range 2.1-5.2 percentile points). The mean height, weight, and BMI percentiles did not change significantly in patients in the methotrexate-only group.
Etanercept treatment, with or without methotrexate, may contribute to the restoration of normal growth in children with JIA.

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Available from: Andreas Reiff, Feb 17, 2015
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    • "Giannini et al conducted a 3-year, open-label, nonrandomized study of 594 children with polyarticular or systemic JIA treated with etanercept only, etanercept plus methotrexate, or methotrexate alone. Weight, height and body mass index were assessed at baseline and at years 1, 2 and 3.55 Statistically significant increases in the mean height percentiles from baseline were seen in the children treated with etanercept at year 3 (4.8 percentile points) and in children treated with the combination therapy of etanercept plus methotrexate at years 1, 2, and 3 (2.4, "
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    • "According to the Dutch registry 77% met the criteria of the ACR Pedi 30 in the first 3 months of treatment; for the majority of patients this improvement was sustained and 53 (36%) of all patients met the remission criteria. (Prince et al., 2009) More recently Giannini et al. (2010) showed that etanercept treatment, with or without methotrexate, may contribute to the restoration of normal growth in children with JIA. "
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