The nocebo effect: A reason for patients' non-adherence to generic substitution?

Article (PDF Available)inPharmazie 65(7):451-6 · July 2010with59 Reads
DOI: 10.1691/ph.2010.9749 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
Substituting generic formulations of the same chemical agent is a common practice in German health care on the basis of so called rebate contracts. The substitution of a medication may affect the patients' adherence or result in adverse events. While adverse events which may be caused by the pharmacological activity of the agent itself can be explained, some non-specific side effects cannot be substantiated referring to pharmacological factors. These adverse reactions are summarized under the term nocebo effect. Since patients experiencing a nocebo effect can subsequently become non-adherent or even discontinue an appropiate therapy, the aim of this article is to study patients' adherence to generic substitution and the extent of the nocebo effect. In MEDLINE and EMBASE, a search was carried out for articles which were published between March 25th, 1989 and March 25th, 2009 by using the following search terms: generic substitution, adherence, non-adherence, non-persistence, rebate contracts, patients' attitude, nocebo, negative placebo effects, placebo adverse reactions, placebo induced side effects and negative placebo responses. In addition a manual search was performed in the reference lists of the articles retrieved. 14 studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria and were included in this article. The generic substitution was generally accepted by over two thirds of the study populations. But up to 34% of patients being treated for psychological diseases confronted with a change of their medication had additional adverse events. On the basis of the studies analysed, the conclusion can be drawn that the nocebo effect can play a crucial role in the treatment of psychological diseases. Therefore, physicians and pharmacists should be responsible to prevent the nocebo effect through adequately educating the patients.
REVIEW
Institut für Gesundheitsökonomie und Klinische Epidemiologie, Köln, Germany
The nocebo effect: A reason for patients’ non-adherence
to generic substitution?
J. Weissenfeld, S. Stock, M. Lüngen, A. Gerber
Received August 19, 2009, accepted December 4, 2009
Jörn Weißenfeld, Institut für Gesundheitsökonomie und Klinische Epidemiologie, Gleueler Str. 176-178 50935 Köln,
Germany
joern.weissenfeld@web.de
Pharmazie 65: 451–456 (2010) doi: 10.1691/ph.2010.9749
Substituting generic formulations of the same chemical agent is a common practice in German health care
on the basis of so called rebate contracts. The substitution of a medication may affect the patients’ adher-
ence or result in adverse events. While adverse events which may be caused by the pharmacological activity
of the agent itself can be explained, some non-specific side effects cannot be substantiated referring to phar-
macological factors. These adverse reactions are summarized under the term nocebo effect. Since patients
experiencing a nocebo effect can subsequently become non-adherent or even discontinue an appropiate
therapy, the aim of this article is to study patients’ adherence to generic substitution and the extent of
the nocebo effect. In MEDLINE and EMBASE, a search was carried out for articles which were published
between March 25th, 1989 and March 25th, 2009 by using the following search terms: generic substitu-
tion, adherence, non-adherence, non-persistence, rebate contracts, patients’ attitude, nocebo, negative
placebo effects, placebo adverse reactions, placebo induced side effects and negative placebo responses.
In addition a manual search was performed in the reference lists of the articles retrieved. 14 studies met
the inclusion and exclusion criteria and were included in this article. The generic substitution was gen-
erally accepted by over two thirds of the study populations. But up to 34% of patients being treated for
psychological diseases confronted with a change of their medication had additional adverse events. On the
basis of the studies analysed, the conclusion can be drawn that the nocebo effect can play a cr ucial role
in the treatment of psychological diseases. Therefore, physicians and pharmacists should be responsible
to prevent the nocebo effect through adequately educating the patients.
1. Introduction
Substituting generic formulations of the same chemical agent
is common practice in the German Statutory Health Insurance
(SHI) on the basis of so called rebate contracts. SHI serves
around 90% of the German population. The rebate contracts are
concluded between individual statutory health funds or umbrella
organizations of funds that traditionally serve the same segment
of population and pharmaceutical companies. Aside from prob-
lems of bioequivalence for specific chemical agents, for instance
theophylline (Weissenfeld et al. 2009), the patients’ expectations
of the new medication play a crucial role with regard to patients’
adherence (Palagyi and Lassanova 2008).
Himmel et al. (2005), for instance, found that 36.7% of all
patients held the view that inexpensive products are infe-
rior to or different from the brand-name drugs. 13.2% of
patients who already had experience with a generic substi-
tute reported adverse effects that had not been observed with
the brand drug. In a survey of GfK-Marktforschung (GfK
Market Research), 43% of patients mentioned that the substitu-
tion with a non-brand drug caused problems. And likewise, 13%
encountered adverse events after the switch (http://www.nav-
virchowbund.de/images/data/GfK-Patientenbefragung.pdf, last
accessed on February 11, 2008).
In order to improve patient care, it would be crucial to evalu-
ate the patients’ attitudes towards and experiences with generic
substitution and to sort out pharmacological adverse effects gen-
erated bythesubstituteddrug from non-pharmacological effects.
The latter are explained by the so called nocebo effect.
The term nocebo was coined as the opposite of placebo that is
to differentiate the positive and the negative effects of a placebo
(Kennedy 1961; Hahn 1985, 1997). According to their defini-
tion, the nocebo effectwould only be caused by an inert chemical
substance. Yet, for the purpose of our study a wider under-
standing of the nocebo effect is applied: The nocebo effect also
denotes any adverse effect that is caused by a medication, but is
not a pharmacological effect.
The existence of the nocebo effect is strongly influenced by a
patient’s expectations, previous experience and the medication’s
appearance (Liccardi et al. 2004). The relevance of patients’
expectations can be demonstrated by the results of the Framing-
ham Study (Eaker et al. 1992): Women who believed that they
had a higher risk to die from a heart attack suffered as a matter
of fact from a heart attack 3.7 times more often than women
who did not believe that they had such a risk. The nocebo effect
usually surfaces as subjectively felt symptoms such as nausea,
headache or itching. But tachykardia, skin rashes or vomiting
as objective signs can also be observed (Liccardi et al. 2004).
Pharmazie 65 (2010) 451
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The objective of this study was to evaluate patients’ adher-
ence despite generic substitution. Furthermore, the size and the
sequelae of the nocebo effect were assessed in order to demon-
strate whether the nocebo effect could be a reason for patients’
non-adherence to generics.
2. Inclusion and exclusion criteria for studies and
Search strategies
Prior to the search, the following criteria for inclusion and exclu-
sion of studies were set up:
(1) Publication between March 25th, 1989 and March 25th,
2009.
(2) The patients’ expectations should not have been influ-
enced verbally before the onset of the study.
Additional criteria for the studies concerning the nocebo effect
were:
(1) Clinical study/ trial or randomized controlled study/ trial.
(2) At least one medication had to be given in the study.
(3) Any side effects not considered a pharmacological effect
should have been analysed separately.
2.1. Search strategies
MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for the time period
indicated. The search terms used were combinations of the
following keywords: generic substitution, adherence, non-
adherence, non-persistence, rebate contracts and patients’
attitude respectively nocebo, negative placebo effects, placebo
adverse reactions, placebo-induced side effects and negative
placebo responses. All hits were analysed on the basis of the
title, the abstract and the key words. In addition, we performed
a manual search in the reference lists of the articles that fulfilled
all inclusion criteria.
3. Patients’ acceptance of generic substitution
Eight studies (see Table 1) from the hits which were found in
MEDLINE and EMBASE could be included into the review
based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria.
Van Wijk et al. (2006) evaluated the association between generic
substitution and non-adherence to antihypertensive drugs. Their
study comprised 463 substituted patients and 565 controls. Sub-
jects were defined as substituted if they had been switched from
their prescribed brand-name product to a generic formulation
for the first time. The patients’ adherence was measured by cal-
culating the medication possession ratio (MPR). Non-adherence
was determined by MPR below 80%. 63 out of 463 substi-
tuted patients (13.6%) versus 111 out of 595 non-substituted
patients (18.7%) were considered to be non-adherent (Crude
OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.49 to 0.96). None of the patients of the
substituted group discontinued the therapy directly after the
switch. There was no difference in hospitalization for cardio-
vascular disease between the groups in the 6 months after the
substitution.
Honrubia Alujer et al. (2007) examined the acceptance of the
replacement of patent medicines by generic formulations among
769 patients. The patients were asked to substitute their pre-
scribed drug by a generic product when the prescribed one was
not available. 698 out of 769 patients (90.8%) agreed to the
substitution of their medication (95% CI; 88.5% to 92.7%).
The main reason for non-acceptance of the replacement was the
fact that the patients did not want any changes in their current
medication (50.7%).
Palagyi and Lassanova (2008) analyzed the patients’ attitudes
to and their experiences with generic drugs in Slovakia. 2000
questionnaires with five questions related to generic prod-
ucts and generic substitution were handed out to patients
via eleven pharmaceutical companies representing the Slovak
Generic Assosiation (GENAS). Responses were received from
1777 out of 2000 patients (88.85%). 61.1% of the patients
did not have any distrust with taking generic drugs. A sig-
nificant difference could be detected with reference to the
patients’ age (p < 0.001): The highest acceptance was found in
the age category up to 30 years (65.7%). 17.5% (311 out of
1775) of the patients preferred being prescribed a brand name
drug albeit being asked a higher co-payment. 56.5% (1003
out of 1775) patients preferred medications with lower co-
payments.
The attitudes to and experiences with generic substitution of
prescribed drugs among patients 50 years old and over were
evaluated by Ringuier et al. (2008) with a self-questionnaire.
440 patients were included in the study. 67% of the patients
had already received a generic by their physicians but only 45%
got additional information on the substitution. Elderly patients
(age category 75 and more) reported more adverse effects after
being switched to a generic formulation compared to theyounger
age group (20% versus 9%; p = 0.027). 72% of the patients
were satisfied with the generic substitution but 57% felt the
need to obtain more information on the substitution. 85% of
them explicitly asked to receive this information from their
physicians.
Patients’ attitudes to and experiences of generic substitution
were also assessed by Kjoenniksen et al. (2006) in Norway.
They included 386 patients who received eight or more differ-
ent drugs and age-adjusted controls who received three to seven
drugs in their study. The study was based on questionnaires
which were mailed to the participants. The response rate was
73% (281 out of 386). 24% of the patients got information on the
generic substitution from their physicians while 53% received
this information from the pharmacy staff (p < 0.001). Patients
who were informed on generic substitution were more likely
to be switched (p < 0.001). The substitution of their prescribed
drug with a product of a lower price was actually effectuated
by 138 (49%) of the patients. 41% preferred not to change their
medication without at the same time seeing financial savings.
Compared to the control group the patients with polypharmacy
were 2.6 times more likely to change to a generic formulation.
Respondents younger than 50 years old were 3.7 times more
likely to effectuate a generic substitution than patients 70 years
and older. 50 of the 138 participants of the study who had been
switched to a generic formulation reported one or more negative
experiences with the generic product.
Shrank et al. (2007) analyzed different factors related to the
utilization of generic drugs. 5399 patients who filled a new pre-
cription in at least 1 of 5 classes of chronic drugs with generic
alternatives were enrolled in the study. 1262 (23.4%) of the
filled prescriptions were generics. Another 606 (14.9%) of the
patients who started their treatment with a brand-name prod-
uct switched to a generic formulation in the subsequent year.
Shrank reported that patients living in high-income zip codes
were more likely to initiate a therapy with generic drugs than
patients in low-income zip codes (p = 0.02). Males in the age
category over 55 years were over 7.5 times more likely to be
substituted with generic formulations than male patients being
less than 25 years old (p = 0.04). The customers of mail-order
pharmacies were 65% more likely to switch to a generic drugs
than those of independent pharmacies (p = 0.003). Participants
of a three-tiered benefit plan were 2.61 times more likely to
switch to generic formulations than those enrolled in a 1- or
2-tier plan (p = 0.03).
452 Pharmazie 65 (2010)
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Table 1: Overview of the studies concerning generic substitution
Number of
participants
Response Rate Mean age of subjects Gender Focus on generic substitution
Kjoenniksen et al.
(2006)
386 73.0% (281) 65.8 167 females 50 of 138 patients who switched
to a generic formulation reported
negative experiences
114 males
Van Wijk et al.
(2006)
463 60.5 235 females 13.6% of the patients who
switched to a generic
formulation were non-adherent
228 males
Palagyi and
Lassanova (2008)
2000 88.9% (1777) Up to 18 years 5% 1033 females 61.1% of the patients did not
have any distrust to use generic
drugs
Up to 30 years 24.5% 743 males
Up to 45 years 32.9% 1 no information
Up to 60 years 25.8%
Above 60 years 11.7%
Ringuier et al.
(2008)
440 50–65 years 45.0% 269 females 72.0% of the patients were
satisfied with the generic
substitution
66–75 years 34.5% 171 males
Above 75 years 20.5%
Honrubia Alujer
et al. (2007)
769 Up to 20 years 4.8% 474 females 90.8% of the patients agreed to
the substitution of their
medication
20–39 years 21.6% 295 males
40–59 years 29.4%
Above 60 years 44.2%
Shrank et al. (2007)
5399 Up to 25 years 10.6% 3261 females Patients were 2.61 times more
likely to switch to a generic
formulation if they were enrolled
in three-tiered benefit plans
25–39 years 23.0% 2138 males
40–55 years 44.5%
Above 55 years 21.9%
Shrank et al. (2009)
2202 48.0% (1047) 51.6 706 females The comfort with the generic
substitution and the
communication with physicians
or pharmacists about generic
products were significantly
associated with the use of
generic drugs
265 males
76 drop outs
Himmel et al. (2005) 804 51.9% NA NA 13.2% of the patients who
switched to a generic formulation
reported additional side effects
The relationship between patients’ beliefs or communication
about generic drugs was also evaluated by Shrank et al. (2009)
by using factor analysis to develop 5 multi-item scales from
1054 patient survey responses. In the fully adjusted model only
the comfort with the generic substitution (p = 0.021) and the
communication with physicians or pharmacists about generic
products (p = 0.012) were significantly associated with the use
of generic drugs.
222 out of a total sample of 804 patients (27.6%) included in a
study done by Himmel et al. (2005) remembered being switched
to a generic drug by their physicians. 112 of the 222 patients had
a sceptical attitude towards the substitution. Nearly 30% were
not satisfied with the information that they had received from
their physicians. 12.2% of the patients reported that the generic
product showed a lower effectiveness than the brand-name for-
mulation. 13.2% complained about additional side effects and
28.9% needed to get used to the new colour or shape of the
drug.
4. Nocebo effect
Six studies (see Table 2) could be included into the review after
applying all inclusion and exclusion criteria.
Liccardi et al. (2004) included 600 patients in their study
who already had complained about medication adverse events.
Participants received capsules or oral solutions with various
concentrations of alternative drugs (vs. placebo), different in
structure from those suspected to have caused the previous
adverse effects. 162 of the patients (27%) mentioned adverse
effects with the placebo. 50/162 had objectively measurable
symptoms such as tachycardia, cough or skin lesions whereas
the rest complained of subjective symptoms. The nocebo-related
effects, however, differed from previous adverse events in more
than two thirds of cases. The prevalence of the nocebo effect
was significantly higher in women than in men (30% vs. 19%,
p = 0.01).
The interaction of the nocebo effect with the participants’ per-
sonality was analysed in a study by Drici et al. (1995) on 52
healthy non-smokers. With the Bortner rating scale, participants
were assessed as type A (competitive and aggressive, N = 16,
31%) or type B (N = 36, 69%). Over a period of seven days,
they were given a drug-containing solution in one eye and a
placebo solution into the other eye four times a day. 50% (N = 8)
of type A participants and 17% (N = 6) of type B participants
reported adverse effects after placebo administration (p = 0.03).
Participants in both groups who exhibited the nocebo effect
had higher mean Bortner rating scores than the non-responders
(201.1 ± 42.2 vs. 178.5 ± 27.4, p = 0.05). A total of 27% (14 out
of 52) exhibited the nocebo effect.
Ströhle (2000) compared the effects of placebo and sodium lac-
tate administration in 14 female and 16 male patients with panic
disorder and in a control group with 23 otherwise healthy par-
ticipants. Participants got infusions of 0.5 M sodium lactate or
0.9% saline over a 20 min period. With the Acute Panic Inven-
tory that collects symptoms of a spontaneous as well as a lactate
induced panic attack the severity of symptoms were assessed
before the infusion and after 10, 20 and 30 min. A score of 20
or more points or an increase of 14 points over the preinjection
score is considered a manifest panic attack (Dillon et al. 1987;
Pharmazie 65 (2010) 453
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Table 2: Overview of the studies concerning the nocebo effect
Number of participants Number of drop outs Mean age of subjects Gender Focus on nocebo
Liccardi et al.
(2004)
600 42 418 females Nocebo effect occurred in 162
out of 600 patients (27%)182 males
Drici et al. (1995)
52 23.5 26 females Nocebo effect occurred in 8 out
of 16 patients (50%) with
behaviour pattern A and 6 out of
36 (17%) type B subjects
26 males
Ströhle (2000)
53 33.2 (female patients) 23 females Evidence for an increased
nocebo response in female
patients with panic disorder
35.8 (male subjects) 30 males
29.4 (female control)
35.5 (male control)
Mondaini et al.
(2007)
120 13 60 (group 1) 120 males 43.6% of group 2 patients
(informed on sexual side effects)
reported side effects as compared
to 15.3% in group 1 (no
information about sexual side
effects)
61 (group 2)
Silvestri et al.
(2003)
96 52 (group A) 96 males 3.1% of the patients in group A
(no information), 15.6% in group
B (informed on given drug) and
31.2% (informed on given drug
and side effects) complained
about erectile dysfunction
52 (group B)
53 (group C)
Uhlenhuth et al.
(1998)
54 1 40.8 28 females Percentage of patients reported
side effects increased from 26%
to 60% after the switch of the
dosage form
26 males
Ströhle et al. 1998, 2000). After the lactate infusion 76.6% of the
patients and 21.7% of the controls had panic attacks (p < 0.05)
while none was observed among the placebo group. The female
participants with panic disorder of the placebo group showed a
significant soaring of their API scores while this did not hap-
pen in the male patients nor in the controls (p < 0.05). “Female
patients with panic disorder had more subthreshold panic anx-
iety as measured with the API score. The data give evidence
for an increased nocebo response in female patients with panic
disorder.” (Ströhle 2000, p. 439.)
Mondaini et al. (2007) detected nocebo induced sexual dys-
functions among 120 (13 drop outs) men with benign prostatic
hyperplasia who received finansteride for 1 year. The first group
of patients (N = 52) got no information that sexual dysfunctions
may appear with the medication. The second group (N = 55)
were handed out a brochure that contained a passage with the
information about the sexual adverse events of finansteride. In
the second group, the adverse effects could be found signif-
icantly more often than in the first group (43.6% vs. 15.3%,
p = 0.03). Erectile dysfunction, decreased libido, and ejacula-
tion disorders could be observed in 9.6%, 7.7%, and 5.7% of
group 1 and in 30.9% (p = 0.02), 23.6% (p = 0.04), and 16.3%
(p = 0.06) in group 2.
A similar result was stated by Silvestri et al. (2003). They
included 96 patients newly diagnosed with a cardiovascular dis-
ease who had no erectile dysfunction into a two-phase study.
32 patients (group A) were prescribed the beta-blocker atenolol
without knowingof what medication they actually took. Another
32 patients (group B) were informed about the medication, but
not about its side effect, and a third group C (32 patients) were
well informed about the chances of an erectile dysfuntion. After
three months of therapy, 3.1% (1 patient) in group A, 15.6%
(5 patients) in group B, and 31.2% (10 patients) in group C
(p < 0.01) complained about erectile dysfuntions. The 16 men
with the erectile dysfunction were randomly assigned to silde-
nafil or placebo (= phase 2 of the study). In all but one of the
sixteen, Sildenafil and placebo had the same effect in reversing
the erectile dysfunction.
Uhlenhuth et al. (1998) analyzed the switch from alprazolam
to extended release alprazolam among 54 patients (1 drop out)
with an anxiety disorder stabilized on alprazolam. After the first
two weeks with their usual product, patients were switched for
two weeks to the extended release formulation. While 26% of
patients complained about adverse effects during the first part,
this went up to 60% after the change. After the switch, 48% of
the documented adverse events were anxiety-like, 37% reported
a sedative effect. Caregiving physicians, however, refered to
only 24% of anxiety related effects as potentially caused by
the medication whereas 74% of the sedative effect might have
been caused by the alteration. Study data may not support the
existence of a pharmacological effect among the anxiety related
adverse effects, yet this may not be fully ruled out since plasma
levels were not measured. A nocebo effect was held accountable
for the anxiety related adverse effects that may not be explained
by the switch in the formula.
5. Discussion
The studies included into our review show that generic substi-
tution is accepted by over two thirds of the patients (Honrubia
Alujer et al. 2007; Palagyi and Lassanova 2008; Ringuier et
al. 2008). Factors that contributed to a higher acceptance of a
switch are financial benefits (e.g., reduction of co-payment),
age (30–50 years old) or information on the substitution from
a physician or pharmacist (Kjoenniksen et al. 2006; Palagyi
and Lassanova 2008; Ringuier et al. 2008; Shrank et al. 2007,
2009).
Yet the findings indicate that the generic substitution can also
make patients non-adherent or trigger additional adverse events
(Himmel et al. 2005; Kjoenniksen et al. 2006; Ringuier et al.
2008; Uhlenhuth et al. 1998; Van Wijk et al. 2006). The obvious
switch of a formula yielded an increase of adverse effects by
454 Pharmazie 65 (2010)
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34% in one study (Uhlenhuth et al. 1998). These adverse events
seemed to be related to the nocebo effect.
Before we will discuss the findings of our reviewand suggestions
for physicians and pharmacists in the patient contact we would
like to dwell on strengths and limitations of the current study.
The study is based upon a literature search complemented by a
manual search in the reference lists of the studies that met our
inclusion criteria. Because of the heterogeneity among partici-
pants and the diversity of the endpoints of the various studies no
meta-analysis could be performed.
A general problem with the detection of the nocebo effect is
that adverse effects cannot be attributed to pharmacological or
non-pharmacological sequelae with certainty. Moreover, there
can be ethical reasons that forbid to perform research on the
nocebo effect and its size. It is possible to produce sequelae
such as asthmatic symptoms (Mc Fadden et al. 1969), allergic
symptoms (Jewett et al. 1990) or hyperalgesia (Benedetti et al.
2003) by inducing patients’ expectations. Yet, this is such a
stressful and terrifying experience for patients that may even
end in real adverse effects for the patients (Benedetti et al.
2007).
The fact that patients who are informed about generic substi-
tution are more likely to be switched (Kjoenniksen et al. 2006;
Palagyi and Lassanova 2008; Shrank et al. 2009) demonstrates
that it remains crucial in any patient-physician encounter that
the physician explains the substitution of a medication. Hence,
physicians may deter any fears that arise around the switch of the
drug in order to increase the patients’ adherence. In addition, the
pharmacist should either attract the patient’s attention to differ-
ences with reference to the prior medication or assure that the
chemical agent is absolutely identical, albeit from a different
manufacturer. Since the rebate contracts result in financial ben-
efits for the statutory health funds, physicians and pharmacists
should be compensated for their additional effort.
The results of this review on the nocebo effect demonstrate
that the nocebo effect often occurs in patients being treated for
psychological diseases (Uhlenhuth et al. 1998). Patient charac-
teristics may contribute to nocebo adverse events (Barsky et al.
2002; Drici et al. 1995). Depression, anxiety, and somatisation
were considered to arise with side effectsafter the administration
of active drugs and to be associated with nocebo-like symptoms
(Andrykowski and Redd 1987; Wolf and Pinsky 1954).
With the 2007 Bill on the Enhancement of Competition in the
SHI statutory health funds were given the right to conclude
rebate contracts with pharmaceutical companies in Germany
(http://bundesrecht.juris.de/sgb
5/, last accessed on November
08, 2009). Pharmacists are obliged to comply with rebate con-
tracts and have to hand out the medications to patients from the
various companies, unless there are pharmaceutical concerns.
Substitution of drugs, hence, is common and daily routine in
pharmacies.
Yet a substitution is not recommended for all active ingre-
dients. In the guidelines “Gute Substitutionspraxis” (Good
practice of drug substitution), the “Deutsche Pharmazeutische
Gesellschaft” recommends to substitute antiepileptics or neu-
roleptics only if reliable data of bioequivalence are available for
the particular product to be substituted. (http://www.dphg.de/
lib/dphg
leitlinie01 gsp
02-1.pdf, last accessed on November
08, 2009). Nevertheless, several health insurance funds con-
cluded rebate contracts on active pharmaceutical ingredients
like amisulpride, melperone or citalopram (http://www.aok-
gesundheitspartner.de/bundesverband/arzneimittel/rabatt/index.
html, last accessed on November 08, 2009).
If an antidepressant or neuroleptic is substituted, this may result
in a patient’s non-adherence caused by the nocebo effect or in
the termination of the therapy as the physician would see the
need to switch to a different drug or drug class.
In order to avoid consequences for the patients being treated for
psychological diseases actions should be taken early to prevent
non-pharmacological adverse effects. This is a task that should
be in the physicians’ and pharmacists’ responsibility. Even the
words physicians’ and pharmacists’use play an important role
in the daily practice because some words can trigger nocebo
responses in patients and need to be avoided (Benedetti 2002;
Schenk 2008).
Unless a patient’s doubts could be dispelled in the patient-
physician or patient-pharmacist encounter, substitution should
be avoided.
It is concluded that the nocebo effect can occur in patients being
treated for psychological diseases. In order to avoid discon-
tinuation of therapeutic regimens and economic consequences,
physicians and pharmacists should be committed to adequately
educate their patients and inform them on the nocebo effect.
6. Experimental
The article “The nocebo effect: A reason for patients’ non-adherence to
generic substitution?” is part of Jörn Weissenfeld’s Ph.D. thesis on non-
brand substitution of medication in Germany. Neither the first author nor
the co-authors have received any financial contributions while working on
this article nor are they affiliated in any way with any of the companies whose
products were subject to the trials included into this systematic review. Hence
there are no conflicts of interest to declare.
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456 Pharmazie 65 (2010)
    • "This organisation establishes the so-called negative lists and defines the financing conditions for medicines which are not eligible for obligatory prescription [33]. A widespread practice in German health care to substitute generic version of the same chemical agent is based on socalled rebate contracts [47]. Pharmacists, in order to obtain reimbursement from the statutory health insurance system (Gesetzliche Krankenversicherung), are required, whenever possible, to dispense a less expensive generic product for which a rebate contract was signed. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Objectives: In this paper, we emphasised that effective management of health plans beneficiaries access to reimbursed medicines requires proper institutional set-up. The main objective was to identify and recommend an institutional framework of integrated pharmaceutical care providing effective, safe and equitable access to medicines. Method: The institutional framework of drug policy was derived on the basis of publications obtained by systematic reviews. A comparative analysis concerning adaptation of coordinated pharmaceutical care services in the USA, the UK, Poland, Italy, Denmark and Germany was performed. Results: While most European Union Member States promote the implementation of selected e-Health tools, like e-Prescribing, these efforts do not necessarily implement an integrated package. There is no single agent who would manage an insured patients' access to medicines and health care in a coordinated manner, thereby increasing the efficiency and safety of drug policy. More attention should be paid by European Union Member States as to how to integrate various e-Health tools to enhance benefits to both individuals and societies. One solution could be to implement an integrated "pharmacy benefit management" model, which is well established in the USA and Canada and provides an integrated package of cost-containment methods, implemented within a transparent institutional framework and powered by strong motivation of the agent.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015
    • "Although the prescribing psychiatrist cannot control the production of pills to maximize benefits based on physical characteristics, he or she should understand that while generic drugs may be bioequivalent, they are not semantically equivalent. Patients who experience generic substitution report decreased intention to continue taking the medication (Roman, 2009), and up to 34% of patients with new generic substitutes experience adverse medication effects that cannot be substantiated by pharmacological activity (Weissenfeld, Stock, Lungen, & Gerber, 2010). A patient's thoughts and feelings about changes in medication packaging can profoundly affect outcome and should be a focus of treatment discussions. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Abstract A growing body of evidence suggests that psychiatric medication outcomes are shaped significantly by psychological and social factors surrounding the prescribing process. Little, however, is known about the extent to which psychiatry programs integrate this evidence base into residency training or the methods by which this is accomplished. Psychiatry residency program directors and chief residents participated in an exploratory online survey to establish how psychosocial factors known to impact medication outcomes are integrated into psychopharmacology education. While participants highly valued the importance of psychosocial factors in the prescribing process, there was limited emphasis of these factors in psychopharmacology training. Additionally, some teaching methods that could advance understanding of complex interactions in the psychopharmacology relationship were found to be underutilized. Given that medication outcomes are significantly influenced by psychosocial factors, psychiatric educators have a responsibility to teach residents about the evidence base available. Residents exposed to this evidence base will be better equipped to manage the complexities of the psychopharmacology role. The results of this study offer clues as to how psychosocial factors may be more fully integrated into residency psychopharmacology training.
    Article · Jun 2014
    • "Perhaps because of negative medical and public perceptions and a lack of branding, generic medication use is also related to increased rates of non-adherence to treatment (Phillips et al., 2007; Ringe & Moller, 2009), which may explain at least some of the reported disparities between branded and generic treatment outcomes, including reduced drug efficacy (Johnston, 2010; Ringe & Moller, 2009), increased side effects (Johnston, 2010; Weissenfeld, Stock, Lungen, & Gerber, 2009), increased medical utilization (Labiner et al., 2010), and increased risk of death or major health events after changing to a generic (Phillips et al., 2007). When patients in New Zealand believed that their thyroxine medication had been switched to a cheaper 'generic' alternative, reporting of decreased drug efficacy and increased adverse reactions rose dramatically. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A change in the formulation of Eltroxin, a thyroid hormone replacement medication, resulted in a dramatic increase in the number of patients reporting side effects and reduced medication efficacy. However, extensive testing of the new formulation found that the new tablets contained only the stated binding agents and the correct dosage of the active ingredient. The lack of pharmacological explanations for the problems that patients were experiencing lead us to investigate the psychological factors that may have contributed to the health scare that followed the medication change. An analysis of the Eltroxin formulation change was undertaken in order to identify potential contributing factors that made this particular medication switch so problematic. Particular demographics of the Eltroxin patient population, combined with social factors, and intense media coverage all appear to have contributed to the health scare. The influence of television news coverage on Eltroxin adverse event reporting was further investigated. Television news bulletins about Eltroxin significantly increased overall symptom reporting rates, as well as increasing the reporting of the specific symptoms that were mentioned in each television segment. An experimental study was conducted to further investigate the impact of changing from a branded medication to either a branded or generic reformulated medication (all tablets were actually placebos). Experiencing a medication change – to either the branded or generic reformulated tablets – resulted in smaller placebo effects when compared with staying on the original medication. Participants who changed to the generic reformulation attributed significantly more side effects to the tablets than participants who did not experience a medication change. The process of changing medications is problematic for a number of reasons, and can result in increased side effect reporting and decreased medication efficacy. The demographic makeup of the patient population undergoing the change, a noticeable change in the appearance of the medication, high levels of emotional distress, lack of choice and control, and negative perceptions of generic medicines can all contribute to unfavourable outcomes following a medication change. Media coverage can set the scene for a health scare to develop, increase anxiety, and contribute to patients’ expectations that they will experience side effects from the reformulated medication.
    Full-text · Thesis · Jan 2012 · Psychodynamic Psychiatry
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