Article

Acquired urinary incontinence in the bitch Update and perspectives from human medicine Part 2 The urethral component, pathophysiology and medical treatment

Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences B44, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, 4000 Liège, Belgium.
The Veterinary Journal (Impact Factor: 1.76). 10/2010; 186(1):18-24. DOI: 10.1016/j.tvjl.2010.06.011
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Various pathologies can affect the bladder and/or urethral contractility causing signs of urinary incontinence. In this second part of a three-part review, the pathophysiology of impaired urethral contractility (including urethral hyper- and hypotonicity) in the bitch and in women is discussed. Urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) is the most common form of acquired urinary incontinence in bitches and is characterized by a decreased urethral tone. The pathophysiology and current recommended medical treatment options for USMI and cases of modified urethral tonicity due to a neurological disorder or functional outlet obstruction are discussed. Treatment options in human medicine in cases of impaired urethral contractility are described.

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