Article

Neighborhood Effects on Health: Concentrated Advantage and Disadvantage

Department of Sociology, College of Arts and Letters, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive San Diego, CA 92182-4423, USA.
Health & Place (Impact Factor: 2.81). 09/2010; 16(5):1058-60. DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2010.05.009
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

We investigate an alternative conceptualization of neighborhood context and its association with health. Using an index that measures a continuum of concentrated advantage and disadvantage, we examine whether the relationship between neighborhood conditions and health varies by socio-economic status. Using NHANES III data geocoded to census tracts, we find that while largely uneducated neighborhoods are universally deleterious, individuals with more education benefit from living in highly educated neighborhoods to a greater degree than individuals with lower levels of education.

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    • "With their protracted histories of ethnic and economic marginalisation and insecurity, the plantation estates are areas of 'concentrated [health] disadvantage' (Finch et al., 2010). In Fig. 1, we propose a model depicting the complexity of these landscapes for the PHMs who provide community-based health care services in these settings. "

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    • "With their protracted histories of ethnic and economic marginalisation and insecurity, the plantation estates are areas of 'concentrated [health] disadvantage' (Finch et al., 2010). In Fig. 1, we propose a model depicting the complexity of these landscapes for the PHMs who provide community-based health care services in these settings. "
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    • "In addition, neighborhood factors play a significant role in perpetuating health disparities. Neighborhoods affect health through differential exposures to social (eg, cultural norms about health behaviors), psychological (eg, neighborhood safety and experience of discrimination), and physical (eg, exposure to toxins, air or noise pollution, access to healthy food) factors [8] [9]. All of these differential neighborhood experiences are shaped by structural/ institutional forces that determine both vulnerability to harmful exposures and access to helpful resources. "
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