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Hemangioma of the pancreas in a 60-year-old woman A report of a new case

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  • Hopital Mahmouid El matri-Ariana -Tunisia
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... Ahmed, et al. [15] described pancreatic hemangiomas imaging features which were like liver giant hemangiomas with peripheral nodular enhancement and progressive centripetal enhancement. However, many studies have shown that significant enhancement in the arterial phase is not a common manifestation of pancreatic cavernous hemangioma [6,8,[11][12][13][14]17,18], it may be because pancreatic cystic tumors usually contain areas of neovascularization, and the ratio of cystic to solid tissue affects the degree of tumor vessel distribution, which could also influence expected arterial phase signal intensity [6,8,11]. ...
... Tumors located in the head of the pancreas have been treated by pancreaticoduodenectomy in most cases [6,10,11,15,17,21,27,29]. Tumors located in the body and tail of the pancreas [8,12,16,22,24,25] have been treated by local resection with spleen preservation or partial excision. ...
... Pancreatic hemangioma is very rare, especially in adults. Only a few cases of adult pancreatic hemangiomas have been reported in the English literature (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6). They typically appear on computed tomography (CT) as a cystic lesion with contrast enhancement in the arterial phase. ...
... Typically, pancreatic hemangiomas of previously reported adult cases were reported as well-circumscribed with homogeneous lower density and showing intense enhancement after injection of contrast material on CT (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6). According to the only report of its MR findings (1), pancreatic hemangiomas were reported as lesions with iso SI on T1WI and hyper SI on T2WI, similar to cavernous hemangiomas. ...
Article
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Hemangiomas in the pancreas are very rare and only a few cases in adulthood have been reported in the literature. We describe a case of pancreatic hemangiomas in an adult with unique imaging findings. A 23-year-old woman visited the hospital for an incidentally detected pancreatic mass. CT and MRI revealed a multilocular cyst with fluid-fluid levels and no obvious enhancement. The patient underwent surgery and the mass was confirmed as a pancreatic hemangioma. The radiological features and differential diagnosis of this rare lesion are discussed.
... The pancreatic lesion had small dimensions compared to most pancreatic hemangiomas described in the literature [15]. However, Jarboui, et al. [16] present the case of a patient who had a small pancreatic nodule, with tissue density, and which has been proved to be a hemangioma. ...
Article
Abstract Pancreatic hemangiomas are benign tumors extremely rare in adults, rarer than in children. Although were reported a small number of pancreatic hemangiomas, mostly were proved to be hyper vascular tumors. We present the case of a sixty-four years old male who had acute upper abdominal pain, and who was admitted, with the suspicion of acute pancreatitis. Imagistic examinations detected a tissular nodule in the body of the pancreas, with well- defined margins, without capsule, with heterogeneous structure, and with maximum size of 1.9 cm. Also, it was discovered a similar lesion, regarding the imagistic appearance, in the fourth segment of the liver, and a hemangioma in the sixth segment of the liver. There were no lymphadenopathies in ultrasound and computed tomography exams. Although was suspected a pancreatic adenocarcinoma with liver metastasis, the patient was planned for surgery, knowing that this type of neoplasia is extremely aggressive with a poor prognosis if is not surgically removed. Histopathological exam indicate that the pancreatic mass was a hemangioma.
... Pancreatic hemangiomas are especially rare; pancreatic vascular neoplasms collectively account for only 0.1% of all pancreatic tumors. 1 These tumors are usually diagnosed fortuitously by laparotomies performed to diagnose a large, palpable abdominal mass. [2][3][4][5] We presented a very rare case in which a woman without specific symptoms was found with a cavernous hemangioma in the pancreas tail that mimicked metastatic tumor. ...
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Adult pancreatic hemangioma is a rare disease. We presented a case of a woman with pancreatic tail mass mimicking a distant metastasis from the kidney. A 68-year-old woman was found with a left kidney mass on medical checkup. Computed tomography scan showed a 4.3 cm-sized mass in the left kidney, suggesting renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and a strongly enhancing tiny nodule in the pancreatic tail. We could not rule the possibility of RCC metastasis, hence, surgical resection of the pancreatic mass simultaneously with radical nephrectomy for RCC was conducted. Gross pathologic examination revealed hemangioma. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor was positive for CD34, CD31 and factor VIII-related antigen. There were no significant postoperative events, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7 without any complications. Treatment strategies for pancreatic hemangioma have not been established. To our knowledge, this was the first case report of asymptomatic pancreatic hemangioma. In previous literature, treatment differed on a case-by-case basis, ranging from observation to surgical resection. The most important factor in deciding whether to perform surgery is possibly risk-benefit effectiveness; however, tumor location, patient symptoms, and other factors are also important.
... A PubMed and Google Scholar search of the literature using the keywords "pancreas hemangioma" was performed, and pertinent articles and their references were reviewed. Since 1960, a total of twenty-one cases have been reported in nineteen articles (Table 1) [3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19] . Mundinger et al [20] in their 2009 article, stated that a number of nine cases have been described in the medical literature prior to 1939. ...
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Pancreatic hemangioma is a rare type of benign vascular tumor. Low clinical suspicion and inability of current cross sectional imaging techniques to differentiate it from other pancreatic lesions, contribute to the difficulty in making the correct diagnosis. Without a definitive diagnosis, and due to concern for malignancy, in many instances, surgery is performed. We report a case of pancreas cavernous hemangioma in an 18-year-old female. The patient presented with three-month history of epigastric pain. Physical examination and routine blood tests were normal. Abdominal Computed Tomography scan revealed a 5 cm × 6 cm complex non-enhancing cystic mass in the head of pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and EUS guided fine needle aspiration cytology were non-diagnostic. Because of uncontrolled symptoms, the patient underwent surgical resection. Histopathology and Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma of pancreas.
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Pancreatic haemangiomas are a rare cause of pancreatic lesions in adults. Diagnosis is challenging as they are seldom suspected and difficult to differentiate on imaging. Historically, pancreatic haemangiomas have been managed surgically despite their benign nature, largely due to diagnostic uncertainty. We present the case of a 69-year-old woman who, through combination of radiological, biochemical and endoscopic investigations, was diagnosed with pancreatic haemangioma and managed conservatively, avoiding the morbidity and mortality associated with surgical resection of a benign lesion.
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Adult pancreatic hemangioma is an especially rare benign tumor that is hard to diagnose through imaging examinations, meanwhile its histopathological and immunohistochemical studies have rarely been reported. At this time, only 29 cases in 27 publications have been reported. We report a new case as well as review these literatures. A 71-year-old woman came to our hospital with slight pain on left upper abdomen for three days. But the results obtained from the physical or laboratory examination were all negative so that her symptoms could not be explained clearly. The imaging examinations including ultrasonography and computed tomography both showed a mixed mass in the neck of the pancreas. The preoperative diagnosis of cystadenoma or adenocarcinoma was made, with high suspicious of malignancy. The patient underwent a central pancreatectomy with pancreatojejunostomy, but the pathologic diagnosis was pancreatic hemangioma. The immunohistochemical examination found the positive benign vascular markers (CD31, CD34) and negative lymphocyte markers (D2-40). Moreover, Ki-67 negativity also revealed its benign nature. After 36 months of follow-up, the patient has no complaints for abdominal pain. In conclusion, adult pancreatic hemangioma is extremely rare without any specific clinical manifestations. It is usually diagnosed postoperatively by histological examination and immunohistochemical studies. Imaging examinations, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, can't give definite conclusion. Endoscopic-ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration is conditionally worth doing, which can give some hints and exclude the malignancy of the lesion. If malignancy can be safely ruled out, the surgical decision must be made according to risk-benefit analysist. Maybe close observation and regular follow-up are more beneficial options.
Article
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Adult pancreatic hemangioma is an extremely rare disease, with only 22 cases reported since 1939. Pancreatic hemangioma has no specific symptoms, diagnostic imaging, or laboratory findings, making it difficult to be clinically suspected and diagnosed. The majority are confirmed after surgery. In this report, a 61-year-old woman presented with melena and showed multiple small hyper-vascular lesions in the pancreas. A pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor was suspected, and the patient underwent a distal pancreatectomy. The pathology examination and immunohistochemical study revealed a pancreatic hemangioma.
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Background: Pancreatic cavernous hemangioma is an extremely rare benign tumor that is difficult to diagnose on an imaging examination, and its histopathological examination has rarely been reported. Case presentation: Herein, we present the case of a 63-year-old man who was admitted to the hospital due to left upper abdominal pain and defecation unformed for more than 2 years. None of the positive results obtained from the physical examination could explain his symptoms. The imaging examination indicated a multilocular cyst with septa in the head of the pancreas. The patient underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy, and the pathologic diagnosis was pancreatic cavernous hemangioma. The histopathological examination showed that the lesion was positive for benign vascular markers, such as CD31, CD34 and F8, and negative for lymphocyte markers, such as D2-40. Moreover, it was also positive for ERG and cytokeratin markers, CAM5.2 and AE1/AE3, indicating the complexity of its components, and Ki-67 negativity revealed its benign nature. Conclusions: Pancreatic cavernous hemangioma has a complex composition that may be reflected not only in the imaging examination but also in the immunohistochemical detection, and it may achieve a good outcome by surgical excision.
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Pancreatic haemangiomas are benign vascular tumours very rare in adults. Twenty-two cases are described in the literature. The symptoms are non-specific, and therefore rarely clinically suspected, and the vast majority are incidental findings in imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT, angiography or MRI. They appear on CT as a cystic lesion with contrast enhancement in the arterial phase. We present the case of a 36-year-old male patient with no history of disease, referred with lumbar pain and suspected renal calculus after tomography showing hypervascular enhancement in the pancreatic body and infiltrative lesion (possible neuroendocrine neoplasia) on MRI and biliopancreatic echoendoscopy. He was submitted to laparotomy with subtotal pancreatectomy and splenectomy and satisfactory evolution.
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Primary mesenchymal tumors of the pancreas are extremely rare and no comprehensive study of this class of tumors has been previously performed. Twenty cases of the primary mesenchymal tumors of the pancreas were selected and compared clinicopathologic variables with consecutively resected 500 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. Finally, 20 (0.3%) cases were confirmed as primary mesenchymal tumors. The 14 (70%) cases of benign/borderline tumors included 4 cases of fibromatoses, 2 cases of cavernous hemangiomas, 2 cases of schwannomas, 2 cases of solid and cystic hamartomas, 2 cases of solitary fibrous tumors, 1 case of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, and 1 case of angiomyolipoma. The 6 (30%) cases of sarcomas comprised 3 cases of undifferentiated/unclassified sarcomas, 1 case of leiomyosarcoma, 1 case of Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor, and 1 case of atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma. When compared with the 500 ductal adenocarcinomas, the 3 surgically resected sarcomas were larger (mean, 5.8 cm vs 3.6 cm; P = 0.02); however, no difference in median survival time was observed between patients with sarcoma (23 months) and patients with ductal adenocarcinoma (16 months). First, primary mesenchymal tumors of the pancreas are extremely rare. Second, several primary mesenchymal tumor types can be observed in the pancreas. Understanding these rare disease entities will help ensure their correct diagnosis.
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We report an adult pancreatic hemangioma diagnosed on pathological specimen review following pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy for a symptomatic cystic mass in the head of the pancreas. Eight cases of adult pancreatic hemangioma have been reported in literature since 1939. Presenting symptoms, radiographic diagnosis, pathologic characteristics, and treatment of adult pancreatic hemagiomas are discussed following review of all published cases. Copyright (C) 2009 Gerhard S. Mundinger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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To review the features of patients with benign and malignant cystadenomas of the pancreas, focusing on preoperative diagnostic accuracy and long-term outcome, especially for nonoperated serous cystadenomas and resected cystadenocarcinomas. Serous cystadenomas (SCAs) are benign tumors. Mucinous cystic neoplasms should be resected because of the risk of malignant progression. A correct preoperative diagnosis of tumor type is based on morphologic criteria. Despite the high quality of recent imaging procedures, the diagnosis frequently remains uncertain. Invasive investigations such as endosonography and diagnostic aspiration of cystic fluid may be helpful, but their assessment is limited to small series. The management of typical SCA may require resection or observation. Survival after pancreatic resection seems better for cystadenocarcinomas (MCACs) than for ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas. Three hundred ninety-eight cases of cystadenomas of the pancreas were collected between 1984 and 1996 in 73 institutions of the French Surgical Association. Clinical presentation, radiologic evaluation, and surgical procedures were analyzed for 144 operated SCAs, 150 mucinous cystadenomas (MCAs), and 78 MCACs. The outcome of 372 operated patients and 26 nonoperated patients with SCA was analyzed. Cystadenomas represented 76% of all primary pancreatic cystic tumors (398/522). An asymptomatic tumor was discovered in 32% of patients with SCA, 26% of those with MCA, and 13% of those with MCAC. The tumor was located in the head or uncinate process of the pancreas in 38% of those with SCA, 27% of those with MCA, and 49% of those with MCAC. A communication between the cyst and pancreatic duct was discovered in 0.6% of those with SCA, 6% of those with MCA, and 10% of those with MCAC. The main investigations were ultrasonography and computed tomography (94% for SCA, MCA, and MCAC), endosonography (34%, 28%, and 22% for SCA, MCA, and MCAC respectively), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (16%, 14%, 22%), and cyst fluid analysis (22%, 31%, 35%). An accurate preoperative diagnosis of tumor type was proposed for 20% of those with SCA (144 cases), 30% of those with MCA, and 29% of those with MCAC. An atypical unilocular macrocyst was observed in 10% of SCA cases. The most common misdiagnosis for mucinous cystic tumors was pseudocyst (9% of MCAs, 15% of MCACs). Intraoperative frozen sections (126 cases) allowed a diagnosis according to definitive histologic examination in 50% of those with SCA and MCA and 62% of those with MCAC. For management, 93% of patients underwent surgery. Nonoperated patients (7%) had exclusively typical SCA. A complete cyst excision was performed in 94% of benign cystadenomas, with an operative mortality rate of 2% for SCA and 1.4% for MCA. Resection was possible in 74% of cases of MCAC. Mean follow-up of 26 patients with nonresected SCAs was 38 months, and no patients required surgery. For resected MCACs, the actuarial 5-year survival rate was 63%. Spiral computed tomography is the examination of choice for a correct prediction of tumor type. Endosonography may be useful to detect the morphologic criteria of small tumors. Diagnostic aspiration of the cyst allows differentiation of the macrocystic form of SCA (10% of cases) and the unilocular type of mucinous cystic neoplasm from a pseudocyst. Surgical resection should be performed for symptomatic SCAs, all mucinous cystic neoplasms, and cystic tumors that are not clearly defined. Conservative management is wholly justified for a well-documented SCA with no symptoms. An extensive resection is warranted for MCAC because the 5-year survival rate may exceed 60%.
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The pancreas is an unusual site for a hemangioma in an infant. A child with obstructive jaundice caused by a pancreatic hemangioma is presented and management strategies for this benign tumor are discussed. A 5-month-old girl presented with a 2-week history of jaundice, pale stools and dark urine. Liver function tests confirmed obstructive jaundice. An abdominal ultrasound scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed an enhancing mass in the head of the pancreas. At laparotomy, a wedge biopsy of the pancreatic tumor was taken and a tube cholecystostomy inserted. Histological examination of the specimen revealed a pancreatic hemangioma with sclerotic features. The high volume of bile loss from the cholecystostomy proved problematic and biliary diversion with a Roux-en-y hepaticojejunostomy was therefore performed. The tumor subsequently regressed spontaneously and was no longer visible on follow-up imaging two years later. The child has since thrived. Pancreatic hemangiomas are rare and may cause diagnostic confusion. Pancreatic resection should be avoided since the natural history of these benign tumors is that of spontaneous involution. Various strategies can be used to manage any associated obstructive jaundice.
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A large pancreatic cavernous hemangioma was found in a 30-year-old man with abdominal distention. Plain and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography (US), and angiography were performed prior to operation. Contrast-enhanced CT and angiography showed a large poorly enhanced hypovascular tumor at the head of the pancreas. But MRI and US disclosed findings compatible with a cavernous hemangioma.
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A large pancreatic cavernous hemangioma was found in a 30-year-old man with abdominal distention. Plain and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography (US), and angiography were performed prior to operation. Contrast-enhanced CT and angiography showed a large poorly enhanced hypovascular tumor at the head of the pancreas. But MRI and US disclosed findings compatible with a cavernous hemangioma.
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Pancreatic haemangiomas in infants are rare. Seven cases have been reported in the literature to date. We report two new cases. One of our cases had antenatal diagnosis and was associated with atypical portal vein thrombosis. The diagnosis was obtained by percutaneous biopsy without complication. For both cases, regression was observed without treatment.