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Towards a Business Process-Oriented Approach to Enterprise Content Management (ECM): The ECM-Blueprinting Framework

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In today's digital information age, companies are struggling with an immense overloadof mainly unstructured data. Reducing search times, fulfilling compliance requirements, andmaintaining information quality represent only three of the associated challenges for all sectors ofindustry. A promising approach to address these challenges is called Enterprise ContentManagement (ECM). However, there are various obstacles organisations face when adoptingECM, since the key challenges of ECM are organisational rather than technological. In this article,we claim that in particular the consideration of an organisation's business process structure iscrucial for ECM success. As a result, we introduce a process-oriented, conceptual frameworkreferred to as ECM-Blueprinting that systemises the major steps of an ECM adoption, such ascontent and ECM software (ECMS) analysis. Our research leads us to conclude that ECM andBusiness Process Management (BPM) represent two strongly related fields of research.
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... There has been a call for ECM research to focus on change management required with implementation [18] and on ECM processes, the enterprise perspective and the users of ECM, rather than technical approaches [8]. ECM has been described following four research dimensions: content, technology, processes and enterprise [19]. The content perspective includes identifying and organizing content as well as the usage by employees and IT, while the technology perspective is based on the systems and hardware needed for content management support. ...
... This literature review identified and discussed two ECM frameworks [2,19] and used the categories to summarise implementation challenges. The literature review shows that there is a gap between research done on ECM challenges in developing countries and developed countries, with most research being based around the developed countries. ...
... To help future researchers fill this gap and to guide our study we proposed a new framework (Fig. 1) that consists of the following dimensions which impact ECM implementations: change management, enterprise, business process, content and technology challenges. The framework is derived from the ECM research framework [19], with the addition of change management challenges derived from the major ECM issues framework [2]. ...
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The need for Enterprise Content Management (ECM) is increasing in the current financial services landscape as it is one of the drivers towards a more structured content environment that can improve information access and distribution. Yet implementations of ECM have had challenges. The purpose of this study is to identify and describe these challenges in the Southern African Development Community region. This descriptive case study made use of a deductive approach. A theoretical framework was used to classify ECM challenges into enterprise, business process, content, technology and change management challenges respectively. The results indicate that enterprise challenges and change management challenges present the most significant challenges to successful ECM implementation initiatives. The major challenges that were identified were a lack of scope management and understanding and stakeholder engagement.
... An explanatory on a case was conducted to show the practicality of the research methods on the process of developing a social content management framework as explained in the next subsection. [6], [9], [10] • Survey [6] • Preliminary interview is used to motivate the research [11]. Besides that, it is conducted to identify the real problem occurs in the working environment and to support the problem from the academic view [12]. ...
... • Develop a proof of concept [6] • Analytical and descriptive evaluation methods [7], [8] • Case study [9], [10] • Delphi Technique is a suitable technique to validate the framework [13], [14]. The Delphi technique is also flexible to use in incomplete study instrument concerning on knowledge of problems and phenomena that require expert opinion [15]. ...
Article
Appropriate methodology and research methods are essential to obtain the results of a study and to ensure the results are in response to the research questions raised. In information system discipline, Design Science Research Methodology (DSRM) is one of the methodologies, adopted by researchers to conduct their research. However, there are no specific research methods proposed for each DSRM phase. In this regard, this article articulates the research methods that are relevant to the phases in DSRM. Case analysis is conducted, namely in the process of developing a social content management framework, to show the practicality of the proposed research methods. With the details of the research methods, it is hoped to assist the academicians and novice researchers to understand more about DSRM and its relevant research methods for each phase.
... While the impact of tools like intranets and knowledge management systems on organizational efficiency has been shown , ECMS' impact on organizational efficiency remains uncertain. Typical characteristics of organizational efficiency that we encountered in the context of ECM in our literature study include reducing costs (e.g., Munkvold et al., 2006, search times (e.g., Vom Brocke et al., 2011b), and the time and effort required for content-related activities like reporting and publishing (e.g., Scott et al., 2004, Sprehe, 2005, and improving the use of organizational content , Smith and Mckeen, 2003. ...
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Chapter
Organisations need to measure enterprise content management (ECM) workflow systems performance to achieve their mission and objectives. This requires an exploration of the business environment where ECM workflow systems operate using an appropriate decision-making method and business process management (BPM) values. This paper describes the Delphi method as an appropriate methodology and identifies CERT values as appropriate BPM values with the support from experts and experienced professionals to measure ECM workflow systems performance. CERT values are Customer orientation (C), Excellence (E), Responsibility (R) and Teamwork (T). The purpose of this paper is to explain how the Delphi method can be used to measure ECM workflow systems performance. Further, CERT values are described to drive the business processes through the Delphi method to measure workflow system performance. The paper examines the academic literature on Delphi studies, ECM and CERT values and the benefits of this combination of ideas are revealed. The Delphi method strengths are identified to measure ECM workflow systems performance. Overall, this study focuses on the Delphi rounds as decision-making criteria to formulate a methodology in combination with CERT values to evaluate ECM workflow systems performance.
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Content is simply information that is put to use through the process of repackaging and is then published for a specific purpose (i.e. text, image, 3D data, video, etc.). Organisations deal with various information assets, also known as ‘content’, to run their business operations and make important decisions. Managing content is always a challenge for an organisation. More content, particularly in digital form, that goes beyond the control of organisations is being produced. Enterprise Content Management (ECM) was initiated to help organisations manage their information assets. Over a period of 25 years, ECM has intermittently been the focus of attention due to difficulties in setting a solid research framework and the vagueness of the term ECM. Therefore, this research aims to provide a comprehensive analysis of the ECM literature to identify the current state of knowledge and future research directions. An ECM research framework is proposed to guide the literature review analysis. Based on the analysis, several important observations are highlighted and practical implications for further research are proposed.
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Facing an unprecedented explosion of digital content, many organisations have been left with a large repository of unstructured information. Huge volumes of electronic content have been captured and stored within organisations’ repositories, depriving organisations of the ability to analyse this data properly. As a result, many organisations are facing crucial problems, such as (1) employees wasting 30% of their time looking for relevant information; (2) operational and maintenance cost increases to handle large amounts of data; and (3) loss of opportunities to gain a strategic advantage through proper analysis of organisational data. To overcome these problems, the Enterprise Content Management System (ECMS) was introduced in the early 2000s. Having been researched for a period of 25 years, most prior studies on ECMS focus on a bottom-up approach with the intention of achieving immediate benefits such as cost-reduction, meaningful knowledge work and re-use of previous content. A top-down approach that aims to improve decision-making, resource allocation and competitive intelligence are ignored due to a lack of awareness about the importance of such benefits. Therefore, this research will explore the relationship between ECMS and how it can facilitate decision-making processes. Grounded on previous literature, the contributions of this paper are as follows: first, the paper provides insight into the research from the perspective of ECMS; second, the paper proposes a research model for further exploration of the topic; finally, implications and future directions for research is outlined.
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Chapter
Information systems are used to manage an organisation’s business process management (BPM), its operations and performance. Thus, organisations will benefit from systematic processes for evaluating their business information systems with the aim of developing BPM and business information systems performance. The Delphi Study Technique (DST) is a structured business study technique that can be used as a systematic and interactive assessment process based on controlled feedback from business experts, professionals, or others with relevant experience. The Delphi study technique (also known as the Delphi method) has produced significant achievements in evaluating and improving BPM through identifying BPM values to be used as key indicators. This paper describes the essential stages for measuring the performance of an information system by combining the Delphi method and BPM values to improve an organisation’s business performance. The paper provides examples of the use of DST and discusses empirical results from the published literature.
Presentation
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The presentation defines Enterprise Content Managment (ECM) and outlines essential elements of ECM applications. It also describes some of the ECM standards and best practice guidelines as well as the phases of ECM implementation. It discusses the gap in ECM implementation standards and best practice guidelines and suggests the ECM Maturity model as a possible opportunity to fill the gaps.
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