The Scandinavian Solutions for Wellness study - a two-arm observational study on the effectiveness of lifestyle intervention on subjective well-being and weight among persons with psychiatric disorders

Eli Lilly Danmark A/S, Nybrovej 110, DK - 2800 Lyngby, Denmark.
BMC Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 2.21). 06/2010; 10(1):42. DOI: 10.1186/1471-244X-10-42
Source: DOAJ
ABSTRACT
Solutions for Wellness (SfW) is an educational 3-month program concerning nutrition and exercise for persons with psychiatric disorders on psychotropic medication, who have weight problems. This observational study assessed the impact of SfW on subjective well-being, weight and waist circumference (WC).
Data was collected at 49 psychiatric clinics. Where the SfW program was offered patients could enter the intervention group; where not, the control group. Subjective well-being was measured by the Subjective Well-being under Neuroleptics scale (SWN), at baseline, at the end of SfW participation, and at a follow-up 6 months after baseline. Demographic, disease and treatment data was also collected.
314 patients enrolled in the SfW group, 59 in the control group. 54% of the patients had schizophrenia, 67% received atypical antipsychotics, 56% were female. They averaged 41 +/- 12.06 years and had a BMI of 31.4 +/- 6.35. There were significant differences at baseline between groups for weight, SWN total score and other factors. Stepwise logistic models controlling for baseline covariates yielded an adjusted non-significant association between SfW program participation and response in subjective well-being (SWN increase). However, statistically significant associations were found between program participation and weight-response (weight loss or gain < 1 kg) OR = 2; 95% CI [1.1; 3.7] and between program participation and WC-response (WC decrease or increase < 2 cm) OR = 5; 95% CI [2.4; 10.3]), at 3 months after baseline.
SfW program participation was associated with maintaining or decreasing weight and WC but not with improved subjective well-being as measured with the SWN scale.

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    • "However, inclusion from two different geographical regions made it possible to include more participants and reduce the risk of an outcome colored by a particular local culture. It also is important to stress that the intervention was based on the same concept, " Solutions for Wellness " (Porsdal et al., 2010), and performed in an identical way, except for the number of meetings. As the aim of this research was to study the effects of a lifestyle intervention on healthrelated quality of life and metabolic risk factors in persons with psychosis, the exact number of meetings was considered less important. "
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    • "The search resulted in 656 records in four databases. A screening of the articles and their references initially resulted in 32 eligible studies that were discussed within the research group (JB, FJ, EC, MP), which led to the exclusion of seven more studies: in five of these studies the participants were not randomly assigned to the experimental or the control group3839404142, and the two other studies did not meet the criteria of a lifestyle intervention [43, 44]. The remaining 25 RCT's were included in the meta-analysis (seeFigure 1). "
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    • "The search resulted in 656 records in four databases. A screening of the articles and their references initially resulted in 32 eligible studies that were discussed within the research group (JB, FJ, EC, MP), which led to the exclusion of seven more studies: in five of these studies the participants were not randomly assigned to the experimental or the control group3839404142, and the two other studies did not meet the criteria of a lifestyle intervention [43, 44]. The remaining 25 RCT's were included in the meta-analysis (seeFigure 1). "
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