Article

Are endometrial polyps true cancer precursors?

Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
American journal of obstetrics and gynecology (Impact Factor: 4.7). 09/2010; 203(3):232.e1-6. DOI: 10.1016/j.ajog.2010.03.036
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to assess whether endometrial polyps (EMPs) represent cancer precursors.
Age standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of histologically verified endometrial cancers (EmCas) were estimated in women with EMPs and in women with uterine leiomyomata, which is a condition that is unrelated to endometrial carcinogenesis. SIRs were calculated as the ratio of observed to expected EmCas based on age-specific incidence rates for female Montreal residents during the same period.
Of 1467 women with EMPs, 125 (8.5%) had EmCa. Of 1138 patients with uterine leiomyomata, 133 (11.7%) had EmCa. The SIRs of EmCa for women with EMPs (odds ratio, 8.0; 95% confidence interval, 6.6-9.5) were significantly lower than that in women with leiomyomata (odds ratio, 19.1; 95% confidence interval, 16.0-22.6). Abnormal uterine bleeding was the main reason for evaluating patients with EMP with or without associated EmCa.
The findings of higher EmCa incidence are consistent with enhanced detection opportunity rather than with the endometrial cancer precursor potential of EMPs.

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Available from: Kurosh Rahimi, Sep 17, 2015
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    • "Endometrial polyp (EP) is a common presentation within the gynaecological practice. It is the most frequent endometrial finding in menopausal women [1]. It is usually benign [2] but may be associated with malignancy [3]. "

    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014
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    • "Endometrial polyp (EP) is a common presentation within the gynaecological practice. It is the most frequent endometrial finding in menopausal women [1]. It is usually benign [2] but may be associated with malignancy [3]. "

    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the clinical and epidemiological risk factors for endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women with endometrial polyps, as well as the genetic polymorphism of the progesterone receptor (PROGINS). A case-control study was designed with 160 postmenopausal women with endometrial polyps, compared to a normal Control Group of 400 postmenopausal women. The genotyping of PROGINS polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction. Clinical and epidemiological data were compared between benign endometrial polyps and 118 of the control subjects. Variables were also compared with regard to benign and malignant endometrial polyps. Comparison of the epidemiological variables between groups showed a significant difference for age, ethnicity, time since menopause, parity, tamoxifen use, hypertension and breast cancer, all of them more prevalent in the polyp group. After adjustment for age, statistical significance remained only for parity (OR=1.1), hypertension (OR=2.2) and breast cancer (OR=14.4). There were six cases of malignant polyps (3.7%). The frequency of bleeding was 23.4% for benign polyps and 100% for malignant polyps, with large polyps being detected in 54.6% of the benign cases and in 100 of the malignnat ones. The frequency of arterial hypertension was 54.5% for benign polyps and 83.3% for the malignant ones. The frequency of PROGINS T1/T1, T1/T2 and T2/T2 polymorphism was 79.9%, 19.5% and 0.6%, respectively, for the polyp group, and 78.8%, 20.8% and 0.5% for the Control Group. Elderly age, hypertension, and breast cancer were significantly associated with endometrial polyps. The presence of PROGINS polymorphism was not significantly associated with endometrial polyps. The incidence of malignant polyps was low and strongly associated with bleeding, large-sized polyp and arterial hypertension.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2010 · Revista brasileira de ginecologia e obstetrićia: revista da Federação Brasileira das Sociedades de Ginecologia e Obstetrícia
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