Article

Reliability and Validity of the Multiaxis Profile Dynamometer with Younger and Older Participants

Trace Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA.
Journal of Hand Therapy (Impact Factor: 2). 04/2010; 23(3):281-8; quiz 289. DOI: 10.1016/j.jht.2010.02.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Clinical Measurement.
Grip strength has been administered for many years with a wide variety of instruments and for very different purposes.
To examine the reliability and validity of a new grip measurement device, the multiaxis profile (MAP) dynamometer, compared with the Baseline dynamometer (Fabrication Enterprises Inc., White Plains, NY) and vigorimeter.
Twenty-eight participants (<30 yr, n=14; and >65 yr, n=14) completed grip strength testing using all three devices. Measurements were obtained at baseline and one to two weeks later.
Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for the MAP ranged from 0.94 to 0.99. The other two devices had ICCs of 0.95-0.98. Correlations among the MAP dynamometer, the Baseline dynamometer, and the vigorimeter were 0.78-0.90. The results indicate high concurrent validity among all the three devices and that all devices are reliable instruments to measure the grip strength of both younger and older adults.
In addition to measuring grip strength, the MAP dynamometer measures other grip-related information, such as grip force vectors, rate of force buildup, and force variability. This additional grip information may improve our understanding of hand function and changes because of aging.
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    • "Additional benefits of our dynamometer include continuous measurement of grip force such that the rate of force development, fatigue and force variability can be easily determined. This dynamometer has been tested for repeatability and validity in both younger and older adults (Irwin and Sesto, 2010). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and application of the multi-axis grip dynamometer. "
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    • "cm diameter (Petrofsky et al. 1980, Amis 1987, Blackwell et al. 1999, Edgren et al. 2004, Kong et al. 2007). While these studies provided important data and information for tool products, most of them were performed uniquely on a single force axis of the handle's circumference and some of the forces in other axes were not measured (Irwin and Sesto 2010). However, investigating the force exerted at the hand/handle interface and locating them on each anatomical sites of the hand (fingertips, phalanges, thumb, and palm) is crucial to evaluating the effect of handle characteristics on the grip. "
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    • "Power grip and pinch are included in dynamometry measurements for intrinsic muscle strength (Kosin et al, 1999; Schreuders et al, 2004; 2006), and the Jamar dynamometer is the most common device to assess power grip strength (Irwin and Sesto, 2010). However, power grip strength is generated by a combination of the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles (Kosin et al, 1999; Schreuders et al, 2004). "
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