Education, alcohol use and abuse among young adults in Britain

ArticleinSocial Science [?] Medicine 71(1):143-51 · July 2010with21 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.89 · DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2010.03.022 · Source: PubMed
Abstract

In this article we explore the relationship between education and alcohol consumption. We examine whether the probability of abusing alcohol differs across educational groups. We use data from the British Cohort Study, a longitudinal study of one week's birth in Britain in 1970. We analysed data collected at age 34 (in 2004) and complement it with information gathered at previous sweeps. Measures of alcohol abuse include alcohol consumption above NHS guidelines, daily alcohol consumption and problem drinking. We found that higher educational attainment is associated with increased odds of daily alcohol consumption and problem drinking. The relationship is stronger for females than males. Individuals who achieved high educational test scores in childhood are at a significantly higher risk of abusing alcohol across all dimensions. Our results also suggest that educational qualifications and academic performance are associated with the probability of belonging to different typologies of alcohol consumers among women while this association is not present in the case of educational qualifications and is very weak in the case of academic performance among males.

    • "Apart from the above mentioned factors, education level and age group in our study were found to have a positive indirect effect on risky drinking pattern. Studies have shown that risky drinking pattern increased with age in adolescence while decreased in adulthood (Liang and Chikritzhs, 2013; Talley et al., 2014; Wolff et al., 2014) and people with a higher education level are more likely to have harmful behaviors such as alcohol consumption (Cutler and Lleras-Muney, 2006; Huerta and Borgonovi, 2010). Our results showed that people who had higher education and higher age tended to have a larger family drinking environment and more drinking friends, which may affect their behaviors. "
    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2016
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    • "Apart from the above mentioned factors, education level and age group in our study were found to have a positive indirect effect on risky drinking pattern. Studies have shown that risky drinking pattern increased with age in adolescence while decreased in adulthood (Liang and Chikritzhs, 2013; Talley et al., 2014; Wolff et al., 2014) and people with a higher education level are more likely to have harmful behaviors such as alcohol consumption (Cutler and Lleras-Muney, 2006; Huerta and Borgonovi, 2010). Our results "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Objective: Studies investigating alcohol consumption related factors have rarely focused on the relationship between acculturation, religion and drinking patterns. The objective of this study is to explore the predictors of drinking patterns and their mutual relationships, especially acculturation, ethnicity and religion. Methods: A cross-sectional household survey using a multistage systematic sampling technique was conducted in Yunnan Province of China. A revised Vancouver Index of Acculturation (VIA) and Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) Chinese version were used to measure acculturation and drinking patterns. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to explore the structures of how predictors affect drinking patterns. Results: A total of 977 subjects aged 12-35 years were surveyed. A higher percentage of binge drinking was found among Lisu people. However, the proportion of drinking until intoxication was highest among Han. Gender and enculturation had both direct (standardized β=-0.193, -0.079) and indirect effects (standardized β=-0.126, 0.033) on risky drinking pattern; perceived risk of alcohol consumption (-0.065), family drinking environment (0.061), and friend drinking environment (0.352) affected risky drinking pattern directly, while education level (0.066), ethnicity (-0.038), acculturation (0.012), religious belief (-0.038), and age group (0.088) had indirect effects. Conclusion: Risky drinking pattern was associated with gender and aboriginal culture enculturation both directly and indirectly, and related to mainstream culture acculturation and religious belief indirectly. Other demographic (such as education level) and social family factors (friend drinking environment for example) also had effects on risky drinking pattern.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Drug and alcohol dependence
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    • "For research on alcohol abuse as a significant problem for parents and adolescents coping with adverse events, which has become an increasingly relevant concern within Aotearoa New Zealand context, see: (Boscarino et al., 2006; Cerdá et al., 2011a; Cerdá et al., 2011b; Chen et al., 2009; Freisthler et al., 2009; Huerta and Borgonovi, 2010; Marie, 2014; Masten et al., 2009; Pasch et al., 2009; Swahn and Bossarte, 2007; Theall et al., 2009; Visser et al., 2014). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Post-disaster considerations following the Canterbury sequence of earthquakes and aftershocks (December 2015) NB. The following is a lay summary of a more extensive report. For ease of reading referencing within this summary has been kept to a minimum. Complete referencing can be found in the full report available at www.collaborative.org.nz Introduction A literature review of current multidisciplinary academic findings on post-disaster scenarios around the world was commissioned with assistance from The Collaborative Trust and the University of Canterbury. What the review aimed to discover was how members of communities affected by disaster can be supported in order to cope better and, specifically, how we might make use of up-to-date research in ways relevant to communities and young people in the Greater Christchurch Area.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Dec 2015
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