Article

[Orbital varix presenting with enophthalmos. A case report].

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  • Near East University School of Medicine
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Abstract

We report a 23-year-old patient, presenting with enophthalmos in the left eye. The ophthalmologic examination was normal, except a 3-mm enophthalmos measured using the Hertel's exophthalmometer and an intermittent proptosis observed through the Valsalva maneuver. Orbital imaging tests disclosed a retroocular vascular lesion. A carotis arteriography was performed, and it revealed a tumor with vascular elements presumed to be orbital varix. Ultrasound Doppler examination showed a nonechogenic lesion with an increasing volume during Valsalva. Based on these findings, the tumor was diagnosed as orbital varix. We decided to manage the patient conservatively, in the absence of complications such as proptosis with corneal exposure, optic nerve compression, or esthetically unacceptable appearance. Orbital varix is a vascular anomaly, accounting for 2 % of orbital tumors. It generally presents with an intermittent exophthalmos or orbital hemorrhages. The development of enophthalmos associated with varices, such as reported in our case, is rare.

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... Unilateral exophthalmos is most often due to an expansive intraorbital process, with more or less insidious development depending on the etiology. The etiologies of unilateral exophthalmos are multiple, rarely represented by an intra-or extra-conical vascular mass and representing about 10% of orbital tumors [1,2]. Orbital varixes are rare, representing 2% of orbital expansive processes and are due to proliferation and dilation of intraorbital venous elements [2,3]. ...
... The etiologies of unilateral exophthalmos are multiple, rarely represented by an intra-or extra-conical vascular mass and representing about 10% of orbital tumors [1,2]. Orbital varixes are rare, representing 2% of orbital expansive processes and are due to proliferation and dilation of intraorbital venous elements [2,3]. They are revealed by an intermittent exophthalmos aggravated by effort or the proclive position. ...
... Vascular tumors and anomalies account for 10% of orbital tumors [1,5]. Among these tumors, hemangiomas, lymphangiomas, and orbital varixes are the most common [2,6]. Orbital varixes are rare, representing 2% of orbital expansive processes. ...
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