Kinetics of intermediate-mediated self-assembly in nanosized materials: A generic model

Article (PDF Available)inThe Journal of Chemical Physics 132(16):164701 · April 2010with 209 Reads
DOI: 10.1063/1.3389502 · Source: PubMed
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Abstract
We propose in this paper a generic model of a nonstandard aggregation mechanism for self-assembly processes of a class of materials involving the mediation of intermediates consisting of a polydisperse population of nanosized particles. The model accounts for a long induction period in the process. The proposed mechanism also gives insight on future experiments aiming at a more comprehensive picture of the role of self-organization in self-assembly processes. (C) 2010 American Institute of Physics. [doi: 10.1063/1.3389502]
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