Article

Macadamia Nut Poisoning of Dogs

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Abstract

Thirteen adult dogs of both sexes, various ages and at least five different breeds presented with sudden onset of various combinations of posterior paresis, recumbency and joint pain between six and 24 hours after earing between 0.7 and 4.9g/kg (mean 3.5g/kg) of kernels (raw or roasted) of Macadamia spp. trees. For a 20kg dog, this dose range represents about 5-40 whole kernels (kernel mean mass 2.5g). All dogs recovered uneventfully within 24 hours of onset. Anecdotal evidence of similar signs and outcomes were recorded for 11 dogs that ate Macadamia kernels during 1992-99, two of which were the subjects of multiple poisoning incidents.

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... They are considered to be a valuable food for their low cholesterol and sodium content and as an excellent source of manganese and thiamine (45). Macadamia nut toxicosis has only been reported in dogs to date (1,(47)(48)(49). ...
... The mechanism of action of their toxicity in the case of dogs is currently unknown and the dose required to induce toxicity has not been established precisely (46). The ingestion of as little as 0.7 g/kg of nuts has been associated with the development of clinical signs in dogs (48). In another case, a series of toxic doses ranging from 2.2 to 62.4 g/kg was reported (49). ...
... In another case, a series of toxic doses ranging from 2.2 to 62.4 g/kg was reported (49). Clinical signs generally develop within 12 h of ingestion and may include weakness (particularly hind limb weakness), depression, vomiting, ataxia, tremors, hyperthermia, abdominal pain, lameness, stiffness, recumbency, and pale mucous membranes (47)(48)(49). ...
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... 2,17,18 M Ma ak ka ad de em mi ia a f fı ın nd dı ığ ğı ı: : Ülkemizde yetişmemekle birlikte artık kolaylıkla bulunan bu fındık arka bacaklarda güçsüzlük, depresyon, kusma, ataksi, tremor, eklemlerde ağrı ve abdominal ağrıya neden olur. 19,20 M Mi ik ko ot to ok ks si in n v ve e a af fl lo ot to ok ks si in nl le er r: : Gıdalara bulaşan bu maddeler kedi ve köpeklerde kusma, karaciğer hasarı, dispne, depresyon, burun kanaması, ikterus ve yaygın damariçi koagulasyona yol açar. Mide koruyucular, antiemetik, K vitamini ve N-asetilsistein ile tedavi edilmelidir. ...
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