Article

Factors influencing HPV vaccination status in a Latino population; and parental attitudes towards vaccine mandates

Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, United States.
Vaccine (Impact Factor: 3.62). 06/2010; 28(25):4186-91. DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2010.04.010
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

We performed a retrospective cohort study in a largely Latino population in Los Angeles, surveying 95 parents of 11-17 year old girls between May and June 2008 to examine factors associated with [1] parental consent for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) immunization one year after vaccine implementation and [2] parental support of an HPV vaccine mandate for adolescents prior to middle school entry. 73% of participants had heard of the HPV vaccine and 37% of daughters had already received the vaccine. Variables associated with vaccination included Latino ethnicity, the belief that vaccines are safe, and that HPV vaccine prevents cervical cancer. The most frequent reasons for refusing vaccination included parental request for more information and missed opportunities in clinic. Variables associated with parents agreeing with a law mandating HPV vaccination included: belief in vaccine safety, recent maternal Pap Smear, HPV vaccination of participant's daughter prior to survey, and Latino ethnicity. Our survey supports the work of previous studies recommending continued educational campaigns emphasizing the safety of HPV vaccine, and its efficacy in reducing cervical cancer.

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    • "e l s e v i e r . c o m / p m e d r recommendation for the vaccine (Guerry et al., 2011; Podolsky et al., 2009; Yeganeh et al., 2010). In addition, approximately 80% of Latino children in the U.S. had health insurance in 2010 and almost 87% reported having a regular source of medical care potentially reducing the barrier to access care. "
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Latino populations, particularly Mexican-Americans who comprise 65% of the Latinos in the U.S., are disproportionately affected by HPV-related diseases. The HPV vaccination completion rates remain low, well below the Healthy People 2020 goal. In this study we assessed the effect of parental education and a text messaging reminder service on HPV vaccine completion rates among eligible children of Mexican American parents. Study design: Nonequivalent group study of Mexican parents of HPV vaccine eligible children attended the Health Window program at the Mexican Consulate in New York City, a non-clinical, trusted community setting, during 2012-2013. 69 parents received HPV education onsite, 45 of whom also received a series of text message vaccination reminders. We measured HPV vaccination completion of the youngest eligible children of Mexican parents as the main outcome. Results: 98% of those in the education plus text messaging group reported getting the first dose of the vaccine for their child and 87% among those in the educational group only (p = 0.11). 88% of those receiving the 1st dose in the text messaging group reported completing the three doses versus 40% in the educational group only (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Parental text messaging plus education, implemented in a community based setting, was strongly associated with vaccine completion rates among vaccine-eligible Mexican American children. Although pilot in nature, the study achieved an 88% series completion rate in the children of those who received the text messages, significantly higher than current vaccination levels.
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    • "In contrast several studies reported that no significant correlation between parental income and vaccine initiation (Rosenthal et al., 2008; Caskey et al., 2009; Gerend et al., 2009; Allen et al., 2010; Pruitt and Schootman, 2010; Reiter et al., 2010; Yeganeh et al., 2010). Knowledge about HPV vaccine significantly influences the practice of HPV vaccine among secondary school girls. "
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the practice and associated factors of HPV vaccine among school girls in Melaka, Malaysia. Methodology: A total number of 612 secondary school girls participated in this study. The questionnaire consists of 38 questions which included 3 sections. The first section is about socio- demography. The Second section is about knowledge and awareness of HPV vaccines. The third section is about practices with associated barriers of HPV vaccination. Verbal consent was obtained from all participants, and data were analyzed using SPSS 13. Results: A total number of 612 secondary school girl students participated in this study. The mean age was 13.93 ± SD (1.09); minimum age was 13 years old and maximum was 17 years old. The majority of them was Malay, from rural areas and had a family monthly income of RM 3000 or less (91.8%, 53.1%, 69.6%; respectively). The majority of the parents of the school girls were with secondary education level (56.4%). The majority of the participants did not have a family history of cervical cancer (99.0%). The prevalence of HPV vaccination was 77.9% among school girls in Melaka. The majority of the participants were vaccinated in their schools (77.0%). About 69% knew about cervical cancer and 77.6% had ever heard about HPV vaccine. Regarding the factors that influence the practice of uptake HPV vaccine, they were age, race, income, parents' education, knowledge about cervical cancer, heard about HPV vaccine and place of getting the vaccine (p<0.001). Conclusion: The prevalence of HPV vaccine among school girls is high. Age, race, income, parents' education, knowledge about cervical cancer, heard about HPV vaccine and place of getting the vaccine were the significant factors that influence the practice of uptake HPV vaccine among school girls.
    Full-text · Dataset · Mar 2014
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    • "In contrast several studies reported that no significant correlation between parental income and vaccine initiation (Rosenthal et al., 2008; Caskey et al., 2009; Gerend et al., 2009; Allen et al., 2010; Pruitt and Schootman, 2010; Reiter et al., 2010; Yeganeh et al., 2010). Knowledge about HPV vaccine significantly influences the practice of HPV vaccine among secondary school girls. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Mar 2014
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