Conference Paper

Air Quality Monitoring with SensorMap

Inst. for Software Integrated Syst., Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN
DOI: 10.1109/IPSN.2008.50 Conference: Information Processing in Sensor Networks, 2008. IPSN '08. International Conference on
Source: IEEE Xplore

ABSTRACT

The mobile air quality monitoring network (MAQUMON) is presented. The system consists of a number of car-mounted sensor nodes measuring different pollutants in the air. The data points are tagged with location and time utilizing an on-board GPS. Periodically, the measurements are uploaded to a server, processed and then published on the SensorMap portal. Given a sufficient number of nodes and diverse mobility patterns, a detailed picture of the air quality in a large area will be obtained at a low cost.

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Available from: Péter Völgyesi, Jun 23, 2015
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    • "sensing projects are using smart phones to monitor traffic and detect accidents [13] [17] [15]; monitor and improve population health [5], and map pollution [18] [29]. Detecting rare, disruptive events, such as earthquakes, using community-held sensors is a particularly promising opportunity [4], but also presents difficult challenges. "
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    ABSTRACT: Can cell phones be used to detect earthquakes? The Community Seismic Network (CSN) is building a dense sensor network from inexpensive and community owned sensors, such as cell phones and USB accelerometers. Detecting rare events such as earthquakes is a difficult sensing problem, and is compounded by the wide variations among sensors in a heterogeneous community network. We demonstrate an end-to-end system using Android cell phones and a cloud fusion center that allows participants to create “mock earthquakes”. Upon detecting such an event, the cloud fusion center issues real-time alerts to the phones. A map-based interface to the fusion center is projected nearby, displaying the information reported by the phones.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jan 2011
  • Source
    • "sensing projects are using smart phones to monitor traffic and detect accidents [13] [17] [15]; monitor and improve population health [5], and map pollution [18] [29]. Detecting rare, disruptive events, such as earthquakes, using community-held sensors is a particularly promising opportunity [4], but also presents difficult challenges. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Can cell phones be used to detect earthquakes? The Community Seismic Network (CSN) is building a dense sensor network from inexpensive and community owned sensors, such as cell phones and USB accelerometers. Detecting rare events such as earthquakes is a difficult sensing problem, and is compounded by the wide variations among sensors in a heterogeneous community network. We demonstrate an end-to-end system using Android cell phones and a cloud fusion center that allows participants to create “mock earthquakes”. Upon detecting such an event, the cloud fusion center issues real-time alerts to the phones. A map-based interface to the fusion center is projected nearby, displaying the information reported by the phones.
    Preview · Conference Paper · Jan 2011
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    • "Implementing a mobile air quality monitoring network enables a detailed picture of air pollution to be constructed based on real-time data from mobile sensors over an entire populated area. The work carried out under the Microsoft Research Grant enabled us to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach and build five car-mounted pollution sensor prototypes, each with an onboard GPS receiver and gas sensors measuring O3, NO2, and CO [14]. The recorded data, however, is only as useful as the manner in which it is presented. "
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents the framework of a mobile air quality monitoring network, with an in-depth discussion of several new innovative techniques for web-based visualization. These techniques allow typical web users to access high-resolution pollution data gathered from a large number of vehicle-mounted mobile sensing devices coupled with highly-accurate static sensor data in an easy-to-use, intuitive interface. Additionally, this interface offers users a set of novel applications to promote health and pollution awareness, including a green trip planner, whereby users can plot routes between two locations based on a path of least exposure to specified pollutants, and an exposure estimator, which allows users to calculate previous levels of exposure to harmful pollutants based only on a single timed GPS track.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Apr 2010
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