Article

Color, Flavor, Texture, and Nutritional Quality of Fresh-Cut Fruits and Vegetables: Desirable Levels, Instrumental and Sensory Measurement, and the Effects of Processing

Department of Food Science & Technology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
Critical reviews in food science and nutrition (Impact Factor: 5.18). 05/2010; 50(5):369-89. DOI: 10.1080/10408391003626322
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The color, flavor, texture, and the nutritional value of fresh-cut fruit and vegetable products are factors critical to consumer acceptance and the success of these products. In this chapter, desirable and undesirable quality attributes of fresh-cut fruit and vegetable products are reviewed. Both instrumental and sensory measurements for determining these critical quality attributes are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of sensory and instrumental quality measurements are described. A review of typical unit operations involved in the production of fresh-cut products is presented. The effects of fresh-cut processing techniques and treatments on sensory quality, including the appearance, texture, flavor (taste and aroma) of vegetables, and fruits are detailed.

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    • "Fresh-cut vegetables are perishable food products with physiological changes during storage faster than in the whole raw materials. This might lead to undesirable quality changes such as discolouration, flavour, odour and texture alterations, and loss of nutritional value (Barrett et al., 2010). Glucosinolates in Brassica vegetables have gained interest due to their possible healthbeneficial effects (Jahangir et al., 2009), and since they together with sugar could influence flavour (Beaulieu and Baldwin, 2002). "
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    ABSTRACT: Freezing point of fresh-cut swede (Brassica napus L. var. napobrassica Rchb.) and turnip (Brassica rapa L. ssp. rapifera Metzg.) dice was measured by the cooling curve method, and mean equilibrium freezing points were found to be -2.67 and -1.97. °C, respectively. This indicates that storage of fresh-cut swede and turnip at temperatures below 0. °C is possible. Fresh-cut swede and turnip were packed in pouches made of biaxially oriented polypropylene film, and a film based on polylactic acid, and stored for 10 d at -2, 0, 5 and 10. °C. One sample of each vegetable was stored at -2°C for 5 d, followed by 5 d of storage at 5°C. Differences in sensory quality between storage at -2. °C and 0. °C were found in appearance attributes only. Both swede and turnip had higher evenness of colour at -2°C than at 0°C.Storage at -2°C vs. 0°C gave lower whiteness for swede but higher for turnip, and lower intensity of hue for turnip only. Increased storage temperature from 0°C to 5 or 10. °C did not change appearance in swede, but in turnip hue and colour intensity increased, and colour evenness and whiteness decreased. Differences in odour, taste and flavour during storage at 5 or 10. °C vs. 0°C were prominent for turnip: decreased sour odour and flavour, green odour and flavour, sulphurous odour and sweet taste, and increased muddy odour and cloying odour and flavour for 5°C or 10°C. For swede, higher storage temperature gave only increased intensity of sulphurous odour and pungent odour. Texture changed for turnip only with decreased juiciness with increased temperature. The lowest temperature (-2. °C) gave the highest sucrose content in both swede and turnip, the highest total sugar content in turnip and the lowest glucose content in swede. Higher storage temperature resulted in higher content of total indolic glucosinolates in both fresh-cut swede and turnip, but a lower content of total aliphatic glucosinolates in turnip only. Increased contents with increased storage temperature were found for glucobrassicin and 4-methoxyglucobrassicin in both vegetables, and decreased contents for glucobrassicanapin and gluconapin in turnip and glucoalyssin in swede. Storage in polylactic acid film resulted in higher weight loss than the biaxially oriented polypropylene film in both vegetables.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Postharvest Biology and Technology
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    • "In general, the overall quality of fresh produce is related to several sensory attributes, such as appearance, texture and flavor (Barrett et al., 2010; Nandane and Jain, 2011). Among all the quality attributes, appearance is the initial quality attribute that attracts consumers, and affects their choice for the first-time purchase; however, other organoleptic characteristics (e.g., flavor and texture) play a crucial role in consumer satisfaction and repeat purchases (Barrett et al., 2010; Francis et al., 2012). As consumers' health awareness increases, nutritional values of food are often intertwined in the consumers' purchasing decision. "
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    ABSTRACT: Microgreens are an emerging food product with scarce information pertaining to their sensory and nutritional properties. In this study, six species of microgreens, including Dijon mustard (Brassica juncea L. Czern.), opal basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), bull's blood beet (Beta vulgaris L.), red amaranth (Amaranthus tricolor L.), peppercress (Lepidium bonariense L.) and China rose radish (Raphanus sativus L.), were evaluated for their sensory attributes and chemical compositions. Results showed that bull's blood beet had the highest rating on acceptability of flavor and overall eating quality while peppercress the lowest. Chemical compositions also differed significantly among the six species. China rose radish had the highest titratable acidity and total sugars, while red amaranth had the highest pH value and lowest total sugars. Regarding the phytonutrient concentrations, the highest concentrations of total ascorbic acid, phylloquinone, carotenoids, tocopherols, and total phenolics were found in China rose radish, opal basil, red amaranth, China rose radish, and opal basil, respectively. The relationships between sensory-sensory attributes and sensory-chemical compositions were further studied. It was found that overall eating quality of microgreens was best correlated with flavor score and microgreen's pH value and total phenolic content were strongly correlated with flavor attributes, e.g., sourness, astringency, and bitterness. In general, despite the differences among individual microgreens, all of the microgreens evaluated in this study demonstrated "good" to "excellent" consumer acceptance and nutritional quality.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Postharvest Biology and Technology
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    • "In general, the overall quality of fresh produce is related to several sensory attributes, such as appearance, texture and flavor (Barrett et al., 2010; Nandane and Jain, 2011). Among all the quality attributes, appearance is the initial quality attribute that attracts consumers, and affects their choice for the first-time purchase; however, other organoleptic characteristics (e.g., flavor and texture) play a crucial role in consumer satisfaction and repeat purchases (Barrett et al., 2010; Francis et al., 2012). As consumers' health awareness increases, nutritional values of food are often intertwined in the consumers' purchasing decision. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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