Conference Paper

Room-Temperature Direct Bonding for Integrated Optical Devices

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Abstract

We report a room-temperature direct bonding technique for wafer combinations of InP-Ce:YIG, Si-InP and Si-LiNbO<sub>3</sub>. This technique is versatile for integrating optical devices that are composed of different crystals.

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