Conference Paper

BLOCS: A smart book-locating system based on RFID in libraries

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Abstract

Recently, the wireless location system become an important issue. However, the previous location mechanisms were seldom proposed for locating applications in library. In this paper, we present a smart Book-LOCating System called BLOCS with two location modes using RFID technology -single book mode and book list mode. The single book mode provides users to find the bookshelf containing the desired book which was misplaced. The book list mode offers a corresponding list of the bookshelves and the misplaced books regularly for a librarian to localize all misplaced books in the wrong bookshelves. The simulation results show that the locating accuracies of the single book mode and the book list mode are more than 90% and 85%, respectively.

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... General modules used in the library; it consists of two parts: the security system and information screens. When scientific studies in the literature are examined, many smart systems based on RFID have been developed [3][4][5][6][7]. Brian et al. [8] developed an near field communication (NFC)based smart library system for book tracking. ...
... RFID antennas are labelled as numbers 1, 2, and 3. When the experimental results obtained were examined, it was seen that the antenna number 3 was insufficient in determining the position, and the antennas numbered 1 and 2 were more effective in determining the position. For this reason, two antennas [2] 2013 an indoor localisation system artificial neural networks RFID accuracy Jin et al. [4] 2016 indoor RFID tracking system parallel irregular fusion estimation RFID -Younis [6] 2012 a smart library management system -RFID -Sue and Lo [7] 2007 a smart book-locating system -RFID accuracy Brian et al. [8] 2014 secured smart library system an IOT-based NFC -Curran and Norrby [9] 2009 location determination within indoor environments -RFID -Dhanalakshmi and Mamatha [10] 2009 library management system -RFID accuracy Bayani et al. [12] 2017 IoT-based library automation and monitoring system implementation framework RFID - ...
... • When the studies in the literature are analysed, there are no studies that detect row, cabinet, and rack. In this study, the [7] book locating system -single book mode 90 --book locating system -book list mode 85 ---Dhanalakshmi and Mamatha [10] library management system 87 ---Ting et al. [14] indoor positioning system 93 ---Xu et al. [15] Bayesian and K-nearest neighbour 88 ---Shangguan et al. [ ...
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LoCA 2005: location and context-awareness
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