Article

Perimenstrual Eletripan Prevents Menstrual Migraine: An Open‐Label Study

Department of Anesthesiology & Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
Headache The Journal of Head and Face Pain (Impact Factor: 2.71). 03/2010; 50(4):551-62. DOI: 10.1111/j.1526-4610.2010.01628.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To prospectively evaluate the efficacy of perimenstrual prophylaxis with eletriptan to reduce headaches in women identified with menstrual migraine (MM).
Female migraineurs self-reporting a substantial relationship between migraine and menses were evaluated with 3 consecutive months of daily headache recording diaries. A relationship between menses and migraine was evaluated using International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-II) criteria and a probability model called Probability MM. Women prospectively diagnosed with ICHD-II MM were treated for 3 consecutive months with perimenstrual eletriptan 20 mg 3 times daily starting 2 days prior to the expected onset of menstruation and continued for a total of 6 days. Headache activity was compared during the 3 months of recording prior to eletriptan therapy and 3 months with eletriptan perimenstrual prevention therapy.
Three months of pretreatment prospective diaries were completed by 126 women. ICHD-II menstrually related migraine was diagnosed in 74%, with pure MM in 7%. Among those women diagnosed with ICHD-II MM, 61 completed at least 1 treatment month. Overall change in headache activity was a 46% decrease. The mean percentage of treated menses without migraine occurring during the 6 days of treatment was 71%. The percentage of subjects with 1, 2, and 3 migraine-free menstrual periods (no migraines occurring 2 days before menses through the first 3 days of menstruation) with eletriptan, respectively, were 14%, 19%, and 53%. Among those subjects who remained headache-free during the 6 days of eletriptan treatment, migraine occurred during the 3 days immediately after discontinuing eletriptan for 9%. Perimenstrual eletriptan was generally tolerated and no abnormalities were identified on the 6(th) day of treatment using either blood pressure recording or electrocardiogram.
Among patients with prospectively identified MM, eletriptan 20 mg 3 times daily effectively reduced MM. A significant reduction in headache activity occurred for 53% of patients.

0 Followers
 · 
9 Reads
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: First Page of the Article
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jun 2003
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To prospectively evaluate the diagnosis of menstrual migraine (MM) by comparing 2 diagnostic systems. Female migraineurs self-reporting a substantial relationship between migraine and menses were evaluated with 3 consecutive months of daily headache recording diaries. A relationship between menses and migraine was evaluated using International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-II) criteria and a probability model called Probability MM. Three months of pretreatment prospective diaries were completed by 126 women. ICHD-II menstrually related migraine was diagnosed in 73.8% with pure MM in 7.1%. ICHD-II and Probability diagnoses agreed for all cases of ICHD-II non-MM and pure MM, with disagreement among women diagnosed with ICHD-II menstrually related migraine, only half of whom were identified as having a relationship with menses greater than chance alone using the Probability model. Interestingly, 20% of those women self-reporting a substantial relationship between migraine and menses were not prospectively diagnosed with MM using either diagnostic system. Differences in menstrual vs nonmenstrual headaches were greater when using the Probability model. Prospective headache diaries are needed to diagnose MM. A probability-based method, which considers the chance occurrence of headaches during the menstrual cycle, identifies fewer women as having menstrually related migraine compared with the diary-based methods recommended by the current ICHD-II candidate criteria.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2010 · Headache The Journal of Head and Face Pain
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Migraine is a prevalent disorder that interferes in quality of life of people who suffer it. Introduction of triptans as symptomatic acute migraine treatment led us to a better understanding of migraine physiopathology, and provided patients a highly favourable benefit-risk therapy. Eletriptan is a second-generation triptan with a high safety profile even in special situations. It has shown to be effective versus placebo in a great number of patients and migraine attacks. In order to reproduce common clinical situations, we also consider head to head comparative trials, meta-analysis, and cost-effectiveness studies, and analyze eletriptan efficacy in non-responders and switching studies, and its use when migraine is still mild. Finally, we evaluate its efficacy in adolescents, menstrual migraine and other types of primary headaches.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2011 · Kranion
Show more