Article

The change in vastus medialis oblique and vastus lateralis electromyographic activity related to shoe heel height during treadmill walking

Department of Physiotherapy, College of Health and Sports Science, Daejeon University, Daejeon 300-716, Korea.
Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation (Impact Factor: 0.71). 01/2010; 23(1):39-44. DOI: 10.3233/BMR-2010-0246
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the effect of different heel heights on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) during treadmill walking.
17 young healthy women (age 22.06 +/- 1.2 years) were recruited. With and without a slope, the participants walked on a treadmill at a speed of 2 km/h for 90 seconds under three conditions: barefoot, 3-cm heels, and 7-cm heels. Data for surface EMG was collected from the standard sites of the VMO and VL during treadmill walking.
Significant differences were observed in the VL EMG activity on the non-dominant side between barefoot and 7-cm heels while walking with and without a slope (p< 0.05). VMO:VL EMG ratios significantly decreased for the non-dominant side while walking with and without a slope (p < 0.05). The post hoc pair-wise comparisons revealed significant differences in barefoot vs. 7-cm heel and 3-cm vs. 7-cm heels.
The findings suggest that high-heeled shoes may contribute to a potential change of the knee joint muscles while walking, especially on the non-dominant side. This study provides information that will notify future research on how high-heeled shoe affects muscle activity around the knee joint.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Kyung-Mi Park, Apr 11, 2014
  • Source
    • "We collected EMG data for each muscle for 20 seconds because the initial and final 5 seconds of the treadmill walking exercise are usually inconsistent. A 1-min rest interval was allotted between the trials to avoid possible muscle fatigue induced by treadmill walking [21]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to determine the effect of walking speed on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the rectus abdominis (RA) and erector spinae (ES) muscles during treadmill high-heeled walking at different shoe heel heights. Twenty-five young healthy women volunteered to participate in this study. The subjects performed treadmill walking at speeds of 3 km/h and 6 km/h for 90 seconds under 3 high-heeled conditions: barefoot, 3-cm heels, and 7-cm heels. Surface electromyography (EMG) data were collected from standard sites on the RA and ES muscles during treadmill walking. For all heel heights, the EMG activity of the RA and ES muscles was significantly higher at the 6 km/h speed than at the 3 km/h speed (p < 0.05). Furthermore, EMG activity increased significantly with increasing shoe heel height, regardless of the walking speed (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that walking speed and shoe heel height may contribute to the increased activity of the trunk muscle during high-heeled walking. This study provides information for future studies performed with the aim of predicting possible changes in trunk muscle activity during high-heeled walking.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation
  • Source
    • "According to a survey on the wearing of shoes, 37–69% of women prefer to wear a high heel, but high-heeled shoes with an excessive focus on fashion can induce musculoskeletal diseases such as plantar fasciitis, hallux valgus, ankle sprain, and chronic lower back pain6,7,8,9,10,11). High heels may contribute to changes in the muscles around the knee joint12); they could also increase the risks of developing of patellofemoral pain (PFP) and knee osteoarthritis, by increasing the joint reaction force via the higher knee extensor moments and knee flexion angles induced13, 14). Furthermore, wearing high heels may increase the risks of back pain and strain injury, as heel height is associated with local muscle activity, fatigue8, 15), and over-loading of the muscles6). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the most appropriate height for shoe heels by measuring the displacement of the COP (center of pressure) and changes in the distribution of foot pressure after walking in flat (0.5 cm), middle-heeled (4 cm), and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for 1 hour. [Methods] A single-subject design was used, with 15 healthy women wearing shoes with heels of each height in a random order. The foot pressure and displacement of COP before and after walking in an ordinary environment for 1 hour were measured using an FDM-S (zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). [Results] The distribution of foot pressure did not change significantly after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but did change significantly after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. Similarly, the COP was not significantly displaced after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but was significantly displaced after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. [Conclusion] Both flat and high-heeled shoes had adverse effects on the body. Middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes are preferable to both flat (0.5 cm) and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for the health and comfort of the feet.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2013 · Journal of Physical Therapy Science
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate electromyographic(EMG) activity of vastus medialis oblique(VMO) and vastus lateralis(VL) following the application of patellar taping during stair stepping. Methods: Both VMO-VL onset timing and VMO/VL ratio of 15 participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) were measured using an surface EMG uint(Myosystem 1400A, Noraxon Inc., USA). The measurements were taken under three conditions in random order of patellar taping, placebo taping, and no-taping. Data were analysed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results: There was a significant difference with patellar taping on VMO/VL amplitude compared with the placebo taping and no-taping conditions during stair stepping, but no significant difference on VMO-VL onset timing. Conclusion: These result indicate that patellar taping on the vastus medialis oblique has effect on the VMO/VL ratio. Increased values of VMO/VL ratio may contribute to patellar realignment and explain the mechanism of pain reduction following patellar taping in participants with PFPS.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2011
Show more