Article

Direct brain recordings fuel advances in cognitive electrophysiology

Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. <>
Trends in Cognitive Sciences (Impact Factor: 21.97). 02/2010; 14(4):162-71. DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2010.01.005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Electrocorticographic brain recordings in patients with surgically implanted electrodes have recently emerged as a powerful tool for examining the neural basis of human cognition. These recordings measure the electrical activity of the brain directly, and thus provide data with higher temporal and spatial resolution than other human neuroimaging techniques. Here we review recent research in this area and in particular we explain how electrocorticographic recordings have provided insight into the neural basis of human working memory, episodic memory, language, and spatial cognition. In some cases this research has identified patterns of human brain activity that were unexpected on the basis of studies in animals.

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Available from: Michael J Kahana
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