Live augmented reality: A new visualization method for laparoscopic surgery using continuous volumetric computed tomography

ArticleinSurgical Endoscopy 24(8):1976-85 · February 2010with21 Reads
Impact Factor: 3.26 · DOI: 10.1007/s00464-010-0890-8 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    Current laparoscopic images are rich in surface detail but lack information on deeper structures. This report presents a novel method for highlighting these structures during laparoscopic surgery using continuous multislice computed tomography (CT). This has resulted in a more accurate augmented reality (AR) approach, termed "live AR," which merges three-dimensional (3D) anatomy from live low-dose intraoperative CT with live images from the laparoscope.
    A series of procedures with swine was conducted in a CT room with a fully equipped laparoscopic surgical suite. A 64-slice CT scanner was used to image the surgical field approximately once per second. The procedures began with a contrast-enhanced, diagnostic-quality CT scan (initial CT) of the liver followed by continuous intraoperative CT and laparoscopic imaging with an optically tracked laparoscope. Intraoperative anatomic changes included user-applied deformations and those from breathing. Through deformable image registration, an intermediate image processing step, the initial CT was warped to align spatially with the low-dose intraoperative CT scans. The registered initial CT then was rendered and merged with laparoscopic images to create live AR.
    Superior compensation for soft tissue deformations using the described method led to more accurate spatial registration between laparoscopic and rendered CT images with live AR than with conventional AR. Moreover, substitution of low-dose CT with registered initial CT helped with continuous visualization of the vasculature and offered the potential of at least an eightfold reduction in intraoperative X-ray dose.
    The authors proposed and developed live AR, a new surgical visualization approach that merges rich surface detail from a laparoscope with instantaneous 3D anatomy from continuous CT scanning of the surgical field. Through innovative use of deformable image registration, they also demonstrated the feasibility of continuous visualization of the vasculature and considerable X-ray dose reduction. This study provides motivation for further investigation and development of live AR.