Article

Molecular mechanisms of compounds affecting bacterial biofilm formation and dispersal

Department of Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy.
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology (Impact Factor: 3.34). 02/2010; 86(3):813-23. DOI: 10.1007/s00253-010-2468-8
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Bacteria can switch between planktonic forms (single cells) and biofilms, i.e., bacterial communities growing on solid surfaces and embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance. Biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria often results in lower susceptibility to antibiotic treatments and in the development of chronic infections; thus, biofilm formation can be considered an important virulence factor. In recent years, much attention has been directed towards understanding the biology of biofilms and towards searching for inhibitors of biofilm development and of biofilm-related cellular processes. In this report, we review selected examples of target-based screening for anti-biofilm agents: We focus on inhibitors of quorum sensing, possibly the most characterized target for molecules with anti-biofilm activity, and on compounds interfering with the metabolism of the signal molecule cyclic di-GMP metabolism and on inhibitors of DNA and nucleotide biosynthesis, which represent a novel and promising class of biofilm inhibitors. Finally, we discuss the activation of biofilm dispersal as a novel mode of action for anti-biofilm compounds.

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Available from: James Grant Burgess, Jul 01, 2015
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    • "Also, the biofilm and their counterpart planktonic cells contrast considerably in their physiology, gene expression pattern, and even morphology. Since they are less sensitive to antimicrobial agents, controlling their growth could be significantly challenging once they are formed (Landini et al., 2010). Furthermore, this biofilm lifestyle ' s associated exogenous stress high tolerance , ineffectiveness to antibiotics or other biocide treatments in their eradication (Rendueles et al., 2013) makes use of antibiotics or other antimicrobial agents against a biofilm infection unproductive. "

    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016
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    • "Also, the biofilm and their counterpart planktonic cells contrast considerably in their physiology, gene expression pattern, and even morphology. Since they are less sensitive to antimicrobial agents, controlling their growth could be significantly challenging once they are formed (Landini et al., 2010). Furthermore, this biofilm lifestyle ' s associated exogenous stress high tolerance , ineffectiveness to antibiotics or other biocide treatments in their eradication (Rendueles et al., 2013) makes use of antibiotics or other antimicrobial agents against a biofilm infection unproductive. "
    Dataset: SJBS

    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
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    • "An interesting mechanism which interferes with biofilm formation in S. aureus involves the heptapeptide RIP (receptor-interacting protein) kinases. This peptide inhibits biofilm formation of S. aureus in vivo, possibly by blocking the agr (accessory gene regulation)-dependent QS system (Landini et al.,2010).Zarko et al. (2015)suggested that decreased biofilm growth are due to the peptide's ability to coat either the biomaterial surface or the bacterium itself. "
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