Article

Stimulating the Anaerobic Degradation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Contaminated Sediments by Providing an Electrode as the Electron Acceptor

Department of Microbiology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA.
Environmental Microbiology (Impact Factor: 6.2). 04/2010; 12(4):1011-20. DOI: 10.1111/j.1462-2920.2009.02145.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The possibility that electrodes might serve as an electron acceptor to simulate the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic contaminated sediments was investigated. Initial studies with Geobacter metallireducens demonstrated that although toluene was rapidly adsorbed onto the graphite electrodes it was rapidly oxidized to carbon dioxide with the electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor. Providing graphite electrodes as an electron acceptor in hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments significantly stimulated the removal of added toluene and benzene. Rates of toluene and benzene removal accelerated with continued additions of toluene and benzene. [(14)C]-Toluene and [(14)C]-benzene were quantitatively recovered as [(14)C]-CO(2), demonstrating that even though the graphite adsorbed toluene and benzene they were degraded. Introducing an electrode as an electron acceptor also accelerated the loss of added naphthalene and [(14)C]-naphthalene was converted to [(14)C]-CO(2). The results suggest that graphite electrodes can serve as an electron acceptor for the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants in sediments, co-localizing the contaminants, the degradative organisms and the electron acceptor. Once in position, they provide a permanent, low-maintenance source of electron acceptor. Thus, graphite electrodes may offer an attractive alternative for enhancing contaminant degradation in anoxic environments.

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    • "Addition of oxygen (Zhi et al., 2015), nitrate (Burland and Edwards, 1999), sulfate (Kohring et al., 1989), or Fe(III) oxides (Villatoro-Monzón et al., 2008) to sites where anaerobic biodegradation predominates has proved to be feasible for enhanced biodegradation of many compounds. In particular, nitrate has an oxidative potential which is close to that of oxygen (Chen and Strous, 2013; Zhang et al., 2010). Few studies have addressed the biodegradation of 4-MCHM in river sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, or investigated the effect of nitrate. "

    Full-text · Article · Mar 2016 · Science of The Total Environment
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