Article

An examination of the interpersonal model of loss of control eating in children and adolescents

Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, DHHS, USA.
Behaviour Research and Therapy (Impact Factor: 3.85). 05/2010; 48(5):424-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.2009.12.012
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The interpersonal model of binge eating disorder proposes that social problems lead to negative affect which, in turn, precipitates binge eating episodes. However, no study to date has examined this model among youth who report loss of control (LOC) eating. Participants were 219 non-treatment-seeking children and adolescent volunteers, age 8-17 years (13.1 +/- 2.8 y; 50% female). Children's social problems were assessed by parent report. Youth completed self-report questionnaires of negative affect that assessed depressive symptoms and anxiety. Participants were interviewed to determine the presence or absence of LOC eating in the month prior to assessment. Structural equation modeling analyses found that social problems were positively related to LOC eating presence (p = .02). Negative affect mediated the relationship between social problems and LOC eating (95% CI Product = .00247, .01336). These preliminary results suggest that the interpersonal model of binge eating may describe one possible pathway for the development of LOC eating among non-treatment-seeking youth.

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    • "This study is the first to empirically examine the interpersonal model of eating disorder psychopathology across eating disorder diagnostic group: ANR, ANBP, BN, BED and EDNOS. The results are consistent with previous research that demonstrated that binge-eating symptoms and eating disorder psychopathology were associated with interpersonal problems mediated through negative affect23242526for all eating disorder diagnostic groups except ANBP. The results of this study indicate that the structural model paths were consistent (i.e. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background Interpersonal model has been validated with binge-eating disorder (BED), but it is not yet known if the model applies across a range of eating disorders (ED). Purpose The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of the interpersonal model in anorexia nervosa (restricting type; ANR and binge-eating/purge type; ANBP), bulimia nervosa (BN), BED, and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). Procedure Data from a cross-sectional sample of 1459 treatment-seeking women diagnosed with ANR, ANBP, BN, BED and EDNOS were examined for indirect effects of interpersonal problems on ED psychopathology mediated through negative affect. Results Findings from structural equation modeling demonstrated the mediating role of negative affect in four of the five diagnostic groups. There were significant, medium to large (.239,.558), indirect effects in the ANR, BN, BED and EDNOS groups but not in the ANBP group. The results of the first reverse model of interpersonal problems as a mediator between negative affect and ED psychopathology were nonsignificant, suggesting the specificity of these hypothesized paths. However, in the second reverse model ED psychopathology was related to interpersonal problems indirectly through negative affect. Conclusion This is the first study to find support for the interpersonal model of ED in a clinical sample of women with diverse ED diagnoses, though there may be a reciprocal relationship between ED psychopathology and relationship problems through negative affect. Negative affect partially explains the relationship between interpersonal problems and ED psychopathology in women diagnosed with ANR, BN, BED and EDNOS. Interpersonal psychotherapies for ED may be addressing the underlying interpersonal-affective difficulties, thereby reducing ED psychopathology.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Comprehensive Psychiatry
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    • "For example, Ansell and colleagues (2012) found that negative/depressive affect mediated the relationship between interpersonal problems on binge eating and eating disorder psychopathology in a community sample of 350 adult women who responded to an advertisement for a research study on eating and dieting. Elliott et al. (2010) found a similar relationship with regard to loss of control over eating on social problems in a sample of non-treatment-seeking children and adolescents. The theorized mechanism of the interpersonal model of binge eating has not been examined with a clinical sample of women with BED. "
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the validity of the interpersonal model of binge-eating disorder (BED) psychopathology in a clinical sample of women with BED. Data from a cross-sectional sample of 255 women with BED were examined for the direct effects of interpersonal problems on BED symptoms and psychopathology, and indirect effects mediated by negative affect. Structural equation modelling analyses demonstrated that higher levels of interpersonal problems were associated with greater negative affect, and greater negative affect was associated with higher frequency of BED symptoms and psychopathology. There was a significant indirect effect of interpersonal problems on BED symptoms and psychopathology mediated through negative affect. Interpersonal problems may lead to greater BED symptoms and psychopathology, and this relationship may be partially explained by elevated negative affect. The results of the study are the first to provide support for the interpersonal model of BED symptoms and psychopathology in a clinical sample of women. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · European Eating Disorders Review
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    • "g upon the extent to which this feedback was expect - ed . The chatroom paradigm was specifically designed to disentangle the neural circuits engaged during each step of this temporally dynamic pro - cess . Individuals with LOC eating commonly report that their eating be - havior is elicited by social conflict or rejection ( Czaja et al . , 2011 ; Elliott et al . , 2010 ; Hartmann et al . , 2012 ; Hilbert et al . , 2010 ) ."
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    ABSTRACT: The interpersonal model of loss of control (LOC) eating proposes that socially distressing situations lead to anxious states that trigger excessive food consumption. Self-reports support these links, but the neurobiological underpinnings of these relationships remain unclear. We therefore examined brain regions associated with anxiety in relation to LOC eating and energy intake in the laboratory. Twenty-two overweight and obese (BMIz: 1.9±0.4) adolescent (15.8±1.6y) girls with LOC eating (LOC+, n=10) and without LOC eating (LOC-, n=12) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a simulated peer interaction chatroom paradigm. Immediately after the fMRI scan, girls consumed lunch ad libitum from a 10,934-kcal laboratory buffet meal with the instruction to "let yourself go and eat as much as you want." Pre-specified hypotheses regarding activation of five regions of interest were tested. Analysis of fMRI data revealed a significant group by peer feedback interaction in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), such that LOC+ had less activity following peer rejection (vs. acceptance), while LOC- had increased activity (p<.005). Moreover, functional coupling between vmPFC and striatum for peer rejection (vs. acceptance) interacted with LOC status: coupling was positive for LOC+, but negative in LOC- (p<.005). Activity of fusiform face area (FFA) during negative peer feedback from high-value peers also interacted with LOC status (p<.005). A positive association between FFA activation and intake during the meal was observed among only those with LOC eating. In conclusion, overweight and obese girls with LOC eating may be distinguished by a failure to engage regions of prefrontal cortex implicated in emotion regulation in response to social distress. The relationship between FFA activation and food intake supports the notion that heightened sensitivity to incoming interpersonal cues and perturbations in socio-emotional neural circuits may lead to overeating in order to cope with negative affect elicited by social discomfort in susceptible youth. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · NeuroImage
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