Influence of Height, Weight, and Body Mass Index on Optic Disc Parameters

ArticleinInvestigative ophthalmology & visual science 51(6):2998-3002 · June 2010with10 Reads
DOI: 10.1167/iovs.09-4470 · Source: PubMed
  • 39.97 · Sun Yat-Sen University of Medical Sciences
  • 35.63 · Singapore Eye Research Institute
  • 55.08 · Singapore National Eye Centre
  • 49.85 · National University of Singapore
Abstract
To examine the influence of body height, body weight, and body mass index (BMI) on optic disc parameters in a population-based study. The Singapore Malay Eye Study examined 3280 persons of Malay ethnicity, aged 40 to 80 years, of whom 2329 (71.0%) had reliable retinal scanning confocal laser tomography images for analyses. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was ascertained by Goldmann applanation tonometry. Body height and weight were measured with standardized protocols; BMI was calculated as weight (kilograms)/height squared (meters). Sociodemographic information was collected in an interviewer-administered questionnaire. In univariate analyses, body height, weight, and BMI were significantly associated with optic cup area, rim area, and cup-to-disc area ratio (all with P < 0.05) but none of the anthropometric parameters was significantly associated with optic disc area (all with P > 0.05). In multiple regression analyses after adjustment for age, sex, optic disc size, axial length, education, family income, and IOP, each SD increase in body height was associated with a 0.042-mm(2) decrease in optic rim area and a 0.020 increase in optic cup-to-disc area ratio; each SD decrease in body weight was associated with a 0.013-mm(2) decrease in optic rim area and a 0.010 increase in optic cup-to-disc ratio; and each SD decrease in BMI was associated with a 0.021-mm(2) decrease in optic rim area and a 0.010 increase in optic cup-to-disc ratio. Persons who are taller or have lower BMI have a smaller neuroretinal rim area and a larger optic cup-to-disc area ratio.
    • "Our study confirms the population-based Singaporean Tanjong Pagar study, in which neuroretinal rim area was significantly and positively associated with body height [25]. In contrast, the Singapore Malay Eye Study showed in multiple regression analyses after adjustment for age, gender, optic disc size, axial length, education, family income, and intraocular pressure, that each higher body height was associated with a smaller neuroretinal rim [26]. The results of our study complement previous investigations in that a lower TLCPD and a higher CSFP may be added to the panoply of ocular and eye-related parameters which are associated with taller body stature. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To examine potential associations between body height, cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference (TLCPD) and prevalence of open-angle glaucoma (OAG) in a population-based setting. METHODS: The population-based Beijing Eye Study 2011 included 3468 individuals with a mean age of 64.6 ± 9.8 years (range:50-93 years). A detailed ophthalmic examination was performed. Based on a previous study with lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) measurements, CSFP was calculated as CSFP[mmHg] = 0.44 × Body Mass Index[kg/m(2)] + 0.16 × Diastolic Blood Pressure[mmHg]-0.18 × Age[Years]-1.91. RESULTS: Data of IOP and CSFP were available for 3353 (96.7%) subjects. Taller body height was associated with higher CSFP (P
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014
    • "In the Barbados Eye Study, persons most likely to have open-angle glaucoma were older men and had a family history of open-angle glaucoma, high intraocular pressure, lean body mass, and cataract history [27]. In a similar manner, Zheng and colleagues in the Singapore Malay Eye Study and Xu and colleagues in the Beijing Eye Study found that persons who were taller or had lower body mass index had a smaller neuroretinal rim area and a larger optic cup-to-disc area ratio [24,26]. In the Central India Eye and Medical Study, glaucoma prevalence was associated with lower body mass index after adjusting for higher age, lower blood hemoglobin concentration, higher intraocular pressure, disc hemorrhages, higher prevalence of myopic retinopathy, lower level of education, longer axial length, thinner retinal nerve fiber layer, higher vertical cup/disc diameter ratio and narrow anterior chamber angle [28]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To examine a potential association between longitudinal changes in intraocular pressure (IOP), arterial blood pressure and body mass index (BMI) in a population-based setting. METHODS: The longitudinal population-based Beijing Eye Study included 2355 subjects with an age of 45+ years who were examined in 2006 and in 2011. The participants underwent a detailed ophthalmic examination including tonometry and measurement of arterial blood pressure and BMI. RESULTS: Data on IOP, arterial blood pressure and BMI measured in 2006 and in 2011 were available for 2257 (95.8%) subjects with a mean age of 59.5 ± 9.7 years. The mean change in IOP was -1.25 ± 2.26 mm Hg, mean change in mean blood pressure -7.4 ± 12.1 mmHg, and mean change in BMI was 0.01 ± 2.04 kg/m(2). In multivariate analysis, the 5-year change in IOP was significantly associated with a higher change in mean blood pressure (P
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2013
    • "In the Barbados Eye Study, persons most likely to have open-angle glaucoma were older men and had a family history of open-angle glaucoma, high intraocular pressure, lean body mass, and cataract history [1]. In a similar manner, Zheng and colleagues in the Singapore Malay Eye Study and Xu and colleagues in the Beijing Eye Study found that persons who were taller or had lower body mass index had a smaller neuroretinal rim area and a larger optic cup-to-disc area ratio [45,46]. Since body mass index is correlated with cerebrospinal fluid pressure, our finding supports the notion that a low cerebrospinal fluid pressure may in some patients play a role in the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy [47,48]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To assess the prevalence of glaucoma in rural Central India. METHODS: The population-based Central India Eye and Medical Study is a population-based study performed in a rural region of Central India. The study included 4711 subjects (aged 30+ years). A detailed ophthalmic and medical examination was performed. Glaucoma was defined by glaucomatous optic disc morphology, and in a second step, by the criteria of the International Society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology (ISGEO). RESULTS: Optic disc photographs were available for 4570 (97.0%) subjects. Glaucoma was detected in 122 subjects (51 unilateral) (2.67% (95%CI: 2.20, 3.14). Glaucoma prevalence for the age groups of 30-39yrs, 40-49yrs, 50-59yrs, 60-69yrs, 70-79yrs, and 80+ years was 0.54% (95%CI: 0.11, 0.98), 1.03% (95%CI: 0.49, 1.57), 1.40% (95%CI: 0.58, 2.23), 6.62% (95%CI: 4.92, 8.31), 8.71% (95%CI: 5.55, 11.75), and 14.3% (95%CI: 4.13, 24.4), respectively. In multivariable analysis, glaucoma was associated with higher age (P
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013
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