Article

Weight Status of Children and Adolescents in a Telepsychiatry Clinic

Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, University of California at Irvine School of Social Ecology , Irvine, CA 92697, USA.
Telemedicine and e-Health (Impact Factor: 1.67). 12/2009; 15(10):970-4. DOI: 10.1089/tmj.2008.0150
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of overweight and obesity is approximately 32% among children and adolescents in the United States. Comorbid conditions associated with pediatric overweight and obesity include psychiatric conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children and adolescents presenting for consultation from rural communities to the UC Davis Telemedicine Program (UCDTP), as well as to collect preliminary data to design an integrated disease management program for children and adolescents with obesity and mental illness. Patients aged 21 and under seen for psychiatric consultation at the UCDTP between 2004 and 2006 were included. Retrospective medical record review was conducted to determine the major psychiatric diagnoses, height, weight, body-mass index, and weight status (underweight/at risk for underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese) for each patient. Of the 230 patients referred, a total of 121 patients had both height and weight values documented. Three patients were underweight; 51 were normal weight; 28 were overweight; 39 were obese. The most common psychiatric diagnoses in the 121 patients were attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n = 40), bipolar disorder (n = 36), and depression (n = 31). The most common psychiatric diagnoses in patients with available weight and height data who were overweight and obese were bipolar disorder (n = 20), depression (n = 18), and ADHD (n = 17). Approximately 55% of child and adolescent patients seen for telepsychiatry consultation whose charts documented height and weight measurements were overweight or obese. Psychiatric diagnoses in overweight youngsters need to be researched further to determine whether the weight change is primary or secondary to mood and/or to treatments, such as medication. At such a high rate of comorbidity, monitoring the weight status of young psychiatric patients in this population is indicated.

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Available from: Stacey Cole, Jan 16, 2014
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    • "In order to deal with problems of weight regain and treatment relapses after 12-24-36 months, telemedicine, a new promising low cost method, has been used for obesity with BED in out-patient settings. This enhances the treatment after in-patients rehabilitation and keeps continuity of care through the involvement of the same clinical in-patient team [34-37]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Overweight and obesity are linked with binge eating disorder (BED). Effective interventions to significantly reduce weight, maintain weight loss and manage associated pathologies like BED are typically combined treatment options (dietetic, nutritional, physical, behavioral, cognitive-behavioral, pharmacological, surgical). Significant difficulties with regard to availability, costs, treatment adherence and long-term efficacy are present. Particularly Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is the therapeutic approach indicated both in in-patient and in out-patient settings for BED. In recent years systemic and systemic-strategic psychotherapies have been implemented to treat patients with obesity and BED involved in familiar problems. Particularly a brief protocol for the systemic-strategic treatment of BED, using overall the strategic dialogue, has been recently developed. Moreover telemedicine, a new promising low cost method, has been used for obesity with BED in out-patient settings in order to avoid relapse after the in-patient step of treatment and to keep on a continuity of care with the involvement of the same clinical in-patient team. The comparison between CBT and Brief Strategic Therapy (BST) will be assessed in a two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial. Due to the novelty of the application of BST in BED treatment (no other RCTs including BST have been carried out), a pilot study will be carried out before conducting a large scale randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT). Both CBT and BST group will follow an in-hospital treatment (diet, physical activity, dietitian counseling, 8 psychological sessions) plus 8 out-patient telephone-based sessions of psychological support and monitoring with the same in-patient psychotherapists. Primary outcome measure of the randomized trial will be the change in the Global Index of the Outcome Questionnaire (OQ-45.2). Secondary outcome measures will be the percentage of BED patients remitted considering the number of weekly binge episodes and the weight loss. Data will be collected at baseline, at discharge from the hospital (c.a. 1 month after) and after 6-12-24 months from the end of the in-hospital treatment. Data at follow-up time points will be collected through tele-sessions. The STRATOB (Systemic and STRATegic psychotherapy for OBesity), a comprehensive two-phase stepped down program enhanced by telepsychology for the medium-term treatment of obese people with BED seeking intervention for weight loss, will shed light about the comparison of the effectiveness of the BST with the gold standard CBT and about the continuity of care at home using a low-level of telecare (mobile phones). ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01096251
    Full-text · Article · May 2011 · Trials
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    • "Furthermore, telemedicine, a new promising low cost method, has been used for obesity with BED in outpatient settings in order to avoid relapse after the inpatient step of treatment and to keep on a continuity of care with the involvement of the same clinical inpatient team [32-35]. "
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the results of the STRATOB (Systemic and STRATegic psychotherapy for OBesity) study, a two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) comparing Brief Strategic Therapy (BST, Nardone or Arezzo model) with the gold standard CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) for the inpatient and telephone-based outpatient treatment of obese people with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) seeking treatment for weight reduction. Primary outcome measure of the randomized trial was change in the Global Index of the Outcome Questionnaire (OQ 45.2). Secondary outcome measures were BED remission (weekly binge episodes < 2) and weight loss. Data were collected at baseline, at discharge from the hospital (c.a. 1 month after) and after 6 months from discharge.. No significant difference between groups (BST vs CBT) was found in the primary outcome at discharge. However, a greater improvement was seen in the BST vs the CBT group (P<.01) in the primary outcome at 6 months. About secondary outcomes, no significant difference between groups were found in weight change both at discharge and at 6 months. Notably, a significant association emerged between treatment groups and BED remission at 6 months in favor of BST (only 20% of patients in BST group reported a number of weekly binge episodes > 2 vs 63.3% in CBT group).
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2011 · Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health
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    ABSTRACT: Not Available
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