Article

Lack of Population Diversity in Commonly Used Human Embryonic Stem-Cell Lines

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic, Valencia University, Valencia, Spain, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, .
New England Journal of Medicine (Impact Factor: 55.87). 12/2009; 362(2):183-5. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc0910371
Source: PubMed

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    • "Federal money could not be used to derive new lines. Science progressed despite these restrictions, but controversy continued as it became clear that the small number of viable and fundable cell lines were not appropriate for all scientific or therapeutic purposes (Martin et al., 2005; Rao & Auerbach, 2006; Wang & Sun, 2005) and were very genetically homogenous (Mosher et al., 2010; Laurent et al., 2010). Congress passed bills expanding federal funding for hESC research in 2006 and again in 2007. "

    Full-text · Article · Jun 2012 · Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
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    • "Federal money could not be used to derive new lines. Science progressed despite these restrictions, but controversy continued as it became clear that the small number of viable and fundable cell lines were not appropriate for all scientific or therapeutic purposes (Martin et al., 2005; Rao & Auerbach, 2006; Wang & Sun, 2005) and were very genetically homogenous (Mosher et al., 2010; Laurent et al., 2010). Congress passed bills expanding federal funding for hESC research in 2006 and again in 2007. "

    Full-text · Article · Jun 2012 · Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
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    • "To identify sites of allele-specific DNA modification and expression in the H1 hESC line, the locations of heterozygous polymorphisms were first identified. Although H1 has previously been genotyped, providing the location of 153,718 heterozygous SNPs [20], each individual is expected to carry more than 1.6 million heterozygous SNPs [21]. This H1 genotyping-array data was therefore used in conjunction with HapMap [22] and 1000 genomes [21] haplotypes to impute the locations of a further 1,572,866 putative heterozygote sites (IMPUTE [23] probability of being a heterozygote > 0.5). "
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