Article

Influence on Energy Kinetics and Histology of Different Preservation Solutions Seen During Cold Ischemia in the Liver

Transplant Science Group, Department of Hepatology and Transplantation, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds West Yorkshire LS9 7TF, United Kingdom.
Transplantation Proceedings (Impact Factor: 0.98). 12/2009; 41(10):4088-93. DOI: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2009.07.107
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Cold flush preservation prolongs tissue viability during ischemia. However, there is little understanding of the effects of various preservation fluids on events during this period. A study of cold ischemia in rat livers was undertaken to compare biochemical and histological changes over time, using three preservation solutions: University of Wisconsin (UW), histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK), and Leeds solution (LS) under development at our institution. Leeds solution is a phosphate-based sucrose solution that like UW contains the impermeant lactobionate and the metabolite allopurinol (1,5-dihydro-4H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-one) which acts as a competitive inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, stopping the breakdown of hypoxanthine to xanthine by oxidizing it to alloxanthine, inhibiting both the conversion of hypoxanthine to xanthine and the conversion of xanthine to uric acid.

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    • "Additionally, due to the ischemia, the endothelial cells start to die, triggering hepatic sinusoidal dilatation. The glycogen stored in the tissue is consumed by the living cells to obtain additional energy during this preservation period, resulting in a decrease in the glycogen level of tissue (Corps et al., 2009; Jain et al., 2004; Natori et al., 1999). All these changes in histology of liver can be detected via specialized stains and quantified by image processing tools under light microscope. "
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    ABSTRACT: In order to gain further insight into the mechanisms of tissue damage during the progression of liver diseases as well as the liver preservation for transplantation, an improved understanding of the relation between the mechanical and histological properties of liver is necessary. We suggest that this relation can only be established truly if the changes in the states of those properties are investigated dynamically as a function of post mortem time. In this regard, we first perform mechanical characterization experiments on three bovine livers to investigate the changes in gross mechanical properties (stiffness, viscosity, and fracture toughness) for the preservation periods of 5, 11, 17, 29, 41 and 53h after harvesting. Then, the histological examination is performed on the samples taken from the same livers to investigate the changes in apoptotic cell count, collagen accumulation, sinusoidal dilatation, and glycogen deposition as a function of the same preservation periods. Finally, the correlation between the mechanical and histological properties is investigated via the Spearman's Rank-Order Correlation method. The results of our study show that stiffness, viscosity, and fracture toughness of bovine liver increase as the preservation period is increased. These macroscopic changes are very strongly correlated with the increase in collagen accumulation and decrease in deposited glycogen level at the microscopic level. Also, we observe that the largest changes in mechanical and histological properties occur after the first 11-17h of preservation.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
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    • "Additionally, due to the ischemia, the endothelial cells start to die, triggering hepatic sinusoidal dilatation. The glycogen stored in the tissue is consumed by the living cells to obtain additional energy during this preservation period, resulting in a decrease in the glycogen level of tissue (Corps et al., 2009; Jain et al., 2004; Natori et al., 1999). All these changes in histology of liver can be detected via specialized stains and quantified by image processing tools under light microscope. "

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    ABSTRACT: An isolated perfused rat liver model was used to investigate biochemical and histologic changes during 2 hours of reperfusion after 24 hours of cold storage to compare Leeds solution (LS) with University of Wisconsin solution (UW). Compared with livers stored in UW, those perfused with LS showed significantly higher bile flow and lower enzyme production (P < .05 by 1-way analysis of variance). For example, after 120 minutes, alanine aminotransferase results were: LS 38.9 U/L vs UW 66.8 U/L and bile flows were LS 10.3 μg/15 min/g liver vs UW 9.2 μg/15 min/g liver. Histologically the reticulin breakdown was greater and its reformation slower in UW-preserved livers. Liver tissue was viable in both groups, as shown by the increased glycogen content after reperfusion in both groups, but seen at a higher rate among LS, perfused livers. In conclusion, LS compared favorably with UW to prevent ischemic damage and so could offer an alternative perfusion medium to UW.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2010 · Transplantation Proceedings
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