CML in pregnancy and childhood

ArticleinBest practice & research. Clinical haematology 22(3):455-74 · September 2009with30 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.12 · DOI: 10.1016/j.beha.2009.09.008 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    With the improved survivals offered by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors has come the necessity to address issues relating to quality of life and one such area is that of fertility and parenting. Animal data suggest that imatinib at standard dosages is unlikely to impair fertility in either adult males or females but human data remain limited. Children born to men who are actively taking imatinib at the time of conception appear healthy and current advice is not to discontinue treatment. In contrast the data relating to children born to women exposed to imatinib during pregnancy are less encouraging. Although numbers are small there has been a disturbing cluster of rare congenital malformations such that imatinib cannot be safely recommended, particularly during the period of organogenesis. The appropriate management of children with CML has also been radically changed by the advent of imatinib. The features of the disease at presentation, the natural history and the response to therapy seem to be identical in children to that seen in adults. Now that imatinib has been in clinical use for almost ten years without severe long-term side effects, most physicians are now comfortable advising a trial of imatinib prior to consideration of transplant. Data relating to the efficacy and safety of second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in childhood is entirely absent and transplant remains the first choice for patients failing imatinib and perhaps also for young patients with sub-optimal responses.