Conference Paper

Dynamic braking resistor for control of subsynchronous resonant modes

Dept. of Electr. Eng., K.F. Univ. of Pet. & Miner., Dhahran
DOI: 10.1109/PESS.2000.868829 Conference: Power Engineering Society Summer Meeting, 2000. IEEE, Volume: 3
Source: IEEE Xplore

ABSTRACT

A dynamic braking resistor control strategy has been proposed to
damp the slowly growing subsynchronous resonant frequency oscillations.
It employs generator speed variation, rotor angle and power variation
signals to switch in braking resistors at the generator terminal. The
proposed control has been tested on the IEEE second benchmark model for
subsynchronous resonance studies. The dynamically switched braking
resistors have been found to control the unstable modes very
effectively. The control algorithm is simple and its realization will
require very little hardware

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Available from: Abu Hamed M.A. Rahim, Dec 26, 2015
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    • "One of the most economical methods usually used to increase the power transfer capability of EHV transmission lines in the insertion of series capacitors [1]. The presence of series capacitors has given rise to the phenomenon of Sub- Synchronous Resonance (SSR) [2]. As a result of switching and other disturbances in the series compensated power system, the turbine generator (T-G) set experiences torsional oscillations in the sub-synchronous frequency range (2 – 45Hz). "
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a method for damping torsional oscillations in large turbo generator using thyristor controlled braking resistor (TCBR). The study is performed on system-1 of the second IEEE benchmark for simulation of sub-synchronous oscillations, using eigenvalue analysis and verified by detailed digital simulation. A dynamic fundamental frequency model for TCBR is developed. The pole placement technique is used to design the control system of TCBR. The shaft torques following a disturbance is computed and analyzed. The obtained results indicate that substantial damping is achieved not only for the torsional oscillatory modes but also for the inertial mode by using the proposed control system.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jan 2009
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    ABSTRACT: Dynamically switched resistor banks connected to the generator transformer bus axe. generally, known to improve transient stability of power systems. In this article, an optimum dynamic braking resistor control strategy is proposed to damp the slowly growing subsynchronous resonant (SSR) frequency oscillations. The control strategy employs feedback of generator speed variation, rotor angle, and power variation signals. The control is designed so as to eliminate the system oscillations as quickly as possible. The proposed control is tested on the IEEE second benchmark model for subsynchronous resonance studies. The dynamically switched braking resistors are found to control unstable SSR modes very effectively. The power requirements of the brakes are demonstrated to be very small. The control algorithm is simple, and its realization will require very little hardware.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2003
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a new concept for damping electro-mechanical oscillations in large turbo generator. The proposed concept is based on coordination between Power System Stabilizer (PSS) and Thyristor Controlled Braking Resistor (TCBR). This coordination will enhance the stability of the inertial and torsional oscillatory modes. The study is performed on system-1 of the second IEEE benchmark for simulation of Sub-Synchronous Oscillations, using eigenvalue analysis and verified by detailed digital simulation. A dynamic fundamental frequency model for TCBR is developed. The pole placement technique is used to design the control system of TCBR and PSS. The shaft torque's following a disturbance is computed and analyzed. The obtained results indicate that substantial damping is achieved by the proposed coordination.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Oct 2009