Article

Plant Foods Consumed by Pan: Exploring the Variation of Nutritional Ecology Across Africa

Department of Primatology, Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.
American Journal of Physical Anthropology (Impact Factor: 2.38). 01/2009; 141(3):476-85. DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.21168
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

It has been shown that differences in resource density and nutrient supply affect variation in ranging patterns, habitat use, and sociality. Among nonhuman primates, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (P. paniscus) have often been used as models for the link between social system and habitat ecology. Field reports suggest that resource density is higher in habitats occupied by bonobos (compared to chimpanzee habitats), and in the West (compared to the East) of the range of chimpanzees. In this study we compared diet quality at the level of species and populations using information from nutritional analyses of fruit and leaves consumed by chimpanzees (three) and bonobos (one population). Quality of plant foods was assessed on the basis of a) the concentration of macronutrients, fiber, and anti-feedants, and b) associations of different nutrient components. Overall plant samples collected at each site differed in terms of macronutrient content. However, nutritious quality and gross energy content of food samples were similar suggesting that dietary quality reflects selectivity rather than habitat ecology. The quality of plant foods consumed by bonobos was within the range of chimpanzees and the quality of plant foods consumed by western chimpanzees was not higher than that of eastern chimpanzees. While the results showed significant variation across forests inhabited by Pan, they did not match with geographical patterns between and within Pan species as proposed in previous studies. This suggests that the nutritional quality of the habitat is not always a reliable predictor of the quality of the diet.

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    • "While reduced feeding competition may promote peaceful relations, the suggested correlation between fruit abundance and sociality, as measured by party size, is not equivalent across different study sites, being positive in some sites but negative in others (Furuichi, 2009). In the Lomako forest, Hohmann and colleagues (Hohmann et al., 2010) also found that the nutritional availability of preferred food in this bonobo site was comparable to other chimpanzee sites. This could be a challenge to the relaxed feeding ecology hypothesis, although what remains to be seen is whether the availability of THV is also similar between bonobo sites and chimpanzee sites. "
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Behaviour
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    • "While reduced feeding competition may promote peaceful relations, the suggested correlation between fruit abundance and sociality, as measured by party size, is not equivalent across different study sites, being positive in some sites but negative in others (Furuichi, 2009). In the Lomako forest, Hohmann and colleagues (Hohmann et al., 2010) also found that the nutritional availability of preferred food in this bonobo site was comparable to other chimpanzee sites. This could be a challenge to the relaxed feeding ecology hypothesis, although what remains to be seen is whether the availability of THV is also similar between bonobo sites and chimpanzee sites. "

    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Behaviour
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    • " 24 . 54 4 . 92 Klainedoxa Mesocarp 15 . 90 9 . 02 Nauclea Mesocarp 19 . 38 10 . 84 Parinari Mesocarp 19 . 15 7 . 34 Sacoglottis Mesocarp 18 . 63 6 . 00 Energy content was measured by burning a sample of the consumed food item in pure oxygen atmosphere using a bomb calorimeter whereby the heat produced is measured in kJ / g dry matter ( details in Hohmann et al . , 2010"
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