Article

Effect of Ramadan Intermittent Fasting on Aerobic and Anaerobic Performance and Perception of Fatigue in Male Elite Judo Athletes

Research Unit Evaluation, Sport, Health, National Center of Medicine and Science in Sports, Tunis, Tunisia.
The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research (Impact Factor: 2.08). 11/2009; 23(9):2702-9. DOI: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181bc17fc
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of the Ramadan intermittent fast (RIF) on aerobic and anaerobic exercise performance in elite judo athletes (Judokas) maintaining their usual training loads. Physical performance tests (squat jump [SJ]), countermovement jump [CMJ], 30-second repeated jump, 30-m sprint, and the multistage fitness test) and fatigue scores were measured in 15 elite Judokas on 4 occasions: before Ramadan (T1), at the beginning of Ramadan (T2), at the end of Ramadan (T3) and 3 weeks after Ramadan. Results showed that 30-m sprint performance, multistage shuttle run test, SJ, and CMJ did not change during Ramadan. However, average power during the 30-second repeated jump test was slightly lower at the end of Ramadan (22.4 +/- 2.3 W/kg; P < 0.05) than before Ramadan (23.4 +/- 2.3 W/kg). There was a minor reduction of 1.3 kg in body mass and an increase in total fatigue scores (T2, 19 +/- 5; T3, 16 +/- 4; both P < 0.05) during Ramadan in comparison with the control period (T1, 12 +/- 3). These results show that the RIF has little effect on aerobic performance and on very short duration sprinting and jumping test performance in elite Judokas. Additionally, experienced athletes can maintain both sufficient energy intake and normal training loads during the RIF. The slight reduction in the 30-second jump test may be associated with reduced central drive and body mass. Collectively, these results suggest that the RIF has little effect on the performance of experienced Judokas, but Muslim athletes who train during the RIF should carefully periodize their training load and monitor their food intake and fatigue levels to avoid performance decrements.

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    • "Indeed, in the study of Chaouachi et al. (2009a), test sessions were scheduled at 14:00 h, while in the present study, they were scheduled later, i.e. at 16:00 h. Also, in the study of Chaouachi et al. (2009a), all judokas trained and lived together and they were continuously supervised by their coaches. It is possible that the present study's judokas haven't kept an optimum lifestyle during Ramadan since they were not under the control of their coaches, which may affect their nocturnal sleep patterns. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
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    • "Indeed, in the study of Chaouachi et al. (2009a), test sessions were scheduled at 14:00 h, while in the present study, they were scheduled later, i.e. at 16:00 h. Also, in the study of Chaouachi et al. (2009a), all judokas trained and lived together and they were continuously supervised by their coaches. It is possible that the present study's judokas haven't kept an optimum lifestyle during Ramadan since they were not under the control of their coaches, which may affect their nocturnal sleep patterns. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
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    • "Likewise, this study showed higher afternoon RPE scores during Ramadan compared with BR. This is consistent with the findings of Chaouachi et al. (2009) who reported an increase in total fatigue scores during Ramadan than BR in elite judokas maintaining their usual training loads. More recently, Chtourou et al. (2011) observed higher RPE scores during Ramadan after the RSA, the Wingate, and the Yo- Yo tests. "
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Ramadan on the diurnal variations of physical performance and perceived exertion in adolescent soccer players. Twelve young male soccer players (age 13.3 ± 0.4 yrs; height 164.8 ± 2.9 cm; body mass 60.9 ± 6.5 kg) completed vertical jump tests and the multistage 20-m shuttle run test one week before Ramadan (BR) and during the fourth week of Ramadan (R4) in the morning and in the afternoon. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scores were obtained after the shuttle test. The results showed that squat jump and countermovement jump performances and predicted VO2max were higher in the afternoon than the morning only BR (p p p p Keywords: endurance performance; fasting; short-term performance; time of day Document Type: Research Article DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09291016.2013.780697 Affiliations: Research Laboratory “Sport Performance Optimization”, National Centre of Medicine and Sciences in Sport (CNMSS), Tunis, Tunisia Publication date: December 1, 2013 $(document).ready(function() { var shortdescription = $(".originaldescription").text().replace(/\\&/g, '&').replace(/\\, '<').replace(/\\>/g, '>').replace(/\\t/g, ' ').replace(/\\n/g, ''); if (shortdescription.length > 350){ shortdescription = "" + shortdescription.substring(0,250) + "... more"; } $(".descriptionitem").prepend(shortdescription); $(".shortdescription a").click(function() { $(".shortdescription").hide(); $(".originaldescription").slideDown(); return false; }); }); Related content In this: publication By this: publisher By this author: Aloui, Asma ; Chtourou, Hamdi ; Hammouda, Omar ; Souissi, Hichem ; Chaouachi, Anis ; Chamari, Karim ; Souissi, Nizar GA_googleFillSlot("Horizontal_banner_bottom");
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