Article

Effect of carbon source on the denitrification in constructed wetlands

ESPC State Key Joint Laboratory, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
Journal of Environmental Sciences (Impact Factor: 2). 01/2009; 21(8):1036-43. DOI: 10.1016/S1001-0742(08)62379-7
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The ability of constructed wetlands with different plants in nitrate removal were investigated. The factors promoting the rates of denitrification including organic carbon, nitrate load, plants in wetlands, pH and water temperature in field were systematically investigated. The results showed that the additional carbon source (glucose) can remarkably improve the nitrate removal ability of the constructed wetland. It demonstrated that the nitrate removal rate can increase from 20% to more than 50% in summer and from 10% to 30% in winter, when the nitrate concentration was 30-40 mg/L, the retention time was 24 h and 25 mg/L dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was ploughed into the constructed wetland. However, the nitrite in the constructed wetland accumulated a little with the supply of the additional carbon source in summer and winter, and it increased from 0.15 to 2 mg/L in the effluent. It was also found that the abilities of plant in adjusting pH and temperature can result in an increase of denitrification in wetlands. The seasonal change may also impact the denitrification.

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Available from: Hong-Ying Hu, May 19, 2014
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