Article

Latent class analysis of the Child Behavior Checklist Obsessive-Compulsive Scale

Department of Psychiatry, Vermont Center for Children, Youth, and Families, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05401, USA.
Comprehensive psychiatry (Impact Factor: 2.25). 11/2009; 50(6):584-92. DOI: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2009.01.005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (OCS) of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) predicts obsessive-compulsive disorder and is highly heritable. Latent class analysis (LCA) of the OCS was used to identify profiles within this 8-item scale and to examine heritability of those profiles. The LCA was performed on maternal CBCL reports of their 6- to 18-year-old children from 2 US nationally representative samples from 1989 (n = 2475, 50% male) and 1999 (n = 2029, 53% male) and from Dutch twins in the Netherlands Twin Registry at ages 7 (n = 10 194, 49.3% male), 10 (n = 6448, 48.1% male), and 12 (n = 3674, 48.6% male) years. The heritability of the resultant classes was estimated using odds ratios of twin membership across classes. A 4-class solution fitted all samples best. The resulting classes were a "No or Few Symptoms" class, a "Worries and Has to Be Perfect" class, a "Thought Problems" class, and an "OCS" class. Within-class odds ratios were higher than across-class odds ratios and were higher for monozygotic than dizygotic twins. We conclude that LCA identifies an OCS class and that class is highly heritable using across-twin comparisons.

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    • "Althoff et al. (2009) also found a BNo or few symptoms^ class that is comparable to our Lower Scoring Class including 81 % of the adolescents. This class was expected, given that the majority of our sample consists of adolescents from the general population, and previous research showed that such a class is always identified when conducting latent class analysis on constructs of psychopathology in community samples (Althoff et al. 2009). In addition, the remaining 19 % of the adolescents belongs to the Higher Scoring Class, what is consistent with prevalence rates of subclinical OC (19 %) and clinical OC (3 %) pathology in youth (Valleni-Basile et al. 1994), referring to the Table 1 Fit statistics for latent class analysis models on the YOCSS "
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    • "In general, individuals in the more severe classes had a younger age at onset, more obsessive-compulsive personality disorder features, and more ordering/symmetry and taboo symptoms; individuals in class 2 were more likely to be male compared with the other classes. The most recent study, published in 2009 by Althoff et al [42], used LCA to examine the latent structure of the 8- item obsessive-compulsive scale of the Child Behavior Checklist in several unselected community-based samples of children, including twin pairs. The authors hypothesized that the LCA would parallel the known factor structure of the Child Behavior Checklist and would identify 2 latent classes. "
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