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Política de inversión, restricciones financieras y estructura de propiedad. Teoría y Evidencia empírica para Brasil

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Esta tesis investiga si la empresa brasileña sufre restricciones financieras y si la estructura de propiedad interfiere en ello. Las implicaciones empíricas son caracterizadas por un modelo dinámico de inversión basado en la Ecuación de Euler. Para una muestra de empresas no financieras cotizadas en la BOVESPA (Bolsa de Valores do Estado de São Paulo) en el período 1995-2006 los resultados han mostrado que la empresa brasileña encara restricciones financieras, tanto para invertir en activo inmovilizado material como en innovación. Además, algunos aspectos de la estructura de propiedad, notadamente, la presencia de un accionista mayoritario o la fuerte presencia de otra empresa no financiera, una familia o el gobierno, se han mostrado capaces de influir positivamente en la reducción de la intensidad con que se manifiestan las dificultades de financiación externa Departamento de Economía Financiera y Contabilidad
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