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The Gothic World of Stephen King: Landscape of Nightmares

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Abstract

Stephen King’s popularity lies in his ability to reinterpret the standard Gothic tale in new and exciting ways. Through his eyes, the conventional becomes unconventional and wonderful. King thus creates his own Gothic world and then interprets it for us. This book analyzes King’s interpretations and his mastery of popular literature. The essays discuss adolescent revolt, the artist as survivor, the vampire in popular literature, and much more.

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The research deals with the frightening events and experiences in the two novels, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, and Stephen King's Pet Sematary (Cemetery), to examine the similarities and differences of events, but with a different time frame, and the reasons that prompted both writers to write a frightening story inspired by imagination, visions and nightmares focus on what is known as the tragic flaw, resurrecting the dead and playing The role of the gods and crossing the red lines to revolve events in a frightening framework with anticipation, apprehension and a tragic end. It harmonizes with the personal lives and experiences of Shelley and King on the one hand and with the elements and characteristics of Gothic literature in two different centuries. Keywords: Gothic genre, Resurrection, Frankenstein and religious doctrine.
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In one of his most famous stories ever written, “The Black Cat” (1843), Edgar Allan Poe chose an animal as a protagonist. However, this pet was going to have an afterlife as one of the most devilish creatures created by the pen of the Bostonian. More than a century later, Flannery O’Connor included a story in her MFA Thesis entitled “Wildcat.” Years later, in 1955, her most recognized story, “A Good Man Is Hard to Find,” was published. Both narratives include a cat, in this case not as a main “character,” but as the element that triggers the subsequent tragedy. In 1977, the magazine 'Cavalier' published a short story by Stephen King under the title of “The Cat from Hell.” King’s cat also drives its owner to physical and mental destruction, as Pluto, the wildcat, and Pitty Sing had done before it. This article is based on how three stories (O’Connor’s “Wildcat” –1947– and “A Good Man Is Hard to Find” –1955– and King’s “The Cat From Hell” –1977–) recreate the characters of the anonymous cat and of Pluto in their pages Moreover, this article also intends to prove the influence of Poe’s “The Black Cat” on authors like Flannery O’Connor and Stephen King.
Research
Edward Stephen King (born September 21, 1947) is a contemporary horror, supernatural fiction, mystery, science fiction, and fantasy author from the United States. His books have sold over 350 million copies worldwide. Many have been made into feature films, miniseries, television shows, and comic books. King has written 54 novels, seven of which were published under the pen name Richard Bachman, as well as six nonfiction books. He's also the author of nearly 200 short stories. The majority of these have been assembled into book collections. This paper emphasizes the history and development of the gothic genre into Stephen King's contemporary gothic. Along with its mysteries, the design of the haunted house is the secret of the mind of the protagonist and the abnormal psyche. Throughout this whole novel, The Gothic main character battles his inner demons-his alcohol abuse, his tempers, and the memory of the violent, alcoholic father and the classic Gothic heroine, but King turns her into a contemporary gothic heroine, who slowly evolves into a mature woman capable of fighting for her sustainability. The terror in the novel is not the beasts inside the hotel, but the beasts that can bring people to bear on the right influence of the environment.
Article
This article examines the female serial killer in relation to horror and trauma in Stephen King’s horror fiction with a particular interest in two of his novels that feature female protagonists, Carrie and Misery. This article argues that King’s work presents a unique case for the female serial killer; she is ruthless and capable of committing acts of murder, yet she is tied to her own and the narrative’s history of trauma. The female serial killer falls both within and outside the parameters of the horror genre to occupy a new dimension where trauma and horror meet. She is the link between the inner world of trauma and addictive public acts of violence, and in King’s narratives the female serial killer is one of the main ingredients in a complex recipe that involves the depiction of violence and serial murder in relation to the dynamics of conformity, agency and transgression.
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Burton Pollin argues that, despite Edgar Allan Poe"s evident legacy in Stephen King"s fiction, Poe"s influence on the writings of this author from Maine has often been overlooked and even ignored by Poe scholars. Pollin suggests that King"s most acclaimed horror novel The Shining (1977) was mostly inspired by Poe"s gothic tales "The Masque of the Red Death" and "The Fall of the House of Usher." Taking Pollin"s premise as a point of departure, this article aims to retrace examples of transtextuality - to use Gérard Genette"s term - between King"s novel The Shining and some of Poe"s gothic tales, thus following Pollin"s initial proposal, but with the view to analyse different passages from King"s novel in comparison with other Poe"s tales that have been hardly mentioned in relation to The Shining. © Departamento de Literatura Española-Universidad de Sevilla.
Book
This interdisciplinary study of literary characters sheds light on the relatively under-studied phenomenon of religious psychopathy. God Behind the Screen: Literary Portrais of Religious Psychopathy identifies and rigorously examines protagonists in works from a variety of genres, written by authors such as Aldous Huxley, Jane Austin, Sinclair Lewis, and Steven King, who are both fervently religous and suffer from a range of disorders underneath the umbrella of psychopathy.
Chapter
At first, we were genuinely bewildered at the idea of writing about teaching Toni Morrison’s Beloved. Where to start? After all, Beloved has many transgeneric qualities: is it a Gothic, specifically an American Gothic tale, a ghost story, a slave narrative, or a novel of eventual redemption by the use of stories? Actually, it is all of the above — and more. What, we asked ourselves, do students need to know about Beloved? What strategies might help to unlock this very complicated narrative? What strategies might we deploy to engage students in this rich but difficult novel?
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Even if A Stir of Echoes (1958) has often been overshadowed by Richard Matheson’s most well-known novels I am Legend (1954) and The Shrinking Man (1956), it should be given the credit it deserves as a novel that functions both as a reflection as well as a source of intertextuality. A Stir of Echoes is rooted in the tradition of the ghost story and the American gothic, but above all, it comprises motifs, characters and twists in the plot that are significantly remindful of some of Poe’s most representative tales. Likewise, being the novel that came to light immediately prior to his films adaptations of Poe’s tales, Richard Matheson must have had A Stir of Echoes in mind in order to expand and transform some of Poe’s stories for his screenplays. This article aims to analyse A Stir of Echoes regarding its intertextuality with Poe’s tales, especially with those that Matheson would later on adapt to the screen.
Article
Standing up with the King: A critical look at Stephen King's epic
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