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Tesaříkovití - Cerambycidae : (Řád: brouci - Coleoptera)

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2. vyd Bibliogr. s. 322-336 a s. 366 Rus. a něm. souhrn

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... Horák et al. (2010) and Sabol (2014) mention older and larger trees to be preferred, whereas Sláma (1998) and Rejzek and Hadulla (2000) consider the species to prefer young, thin trees. There are also some discrepancies regarding host tree vitality; Sláma (1998), Horák et al. (2010) and Sabol (2014) referred to the species as developing mainly in weakened, mechanically damaged or pruned trees, whereas Heyrovský and Sláma (1992) and Rejzek and Hadulla (2000) mention that its development occurs in vital, apparently healthy trees. According to some authors, sun-exposed trees are preferred by R. ungaricus (Sláma 1998;Horák et al. 2010;Sabol 2014). ...
... Thus, highly vital trees that were attacked by R. ungaricus in the present study were mostly supressed, competitively stressed trees. This might be an explanation for observations of the species attacking apparently healthy trees, which was reported by Heyrovský and Sláma (1992) (2000). Similarly, some other phloeoxylophagous insect species such as Pissodes weevils or wood wasps (Siricidae) are known to develop in both damaged trees and supressed understory trees (Schwenke 1974;Dodds et al. 2010). ...
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European mountain forests are unique ecosystems, and they harbour specific saproxylic beetle fauna, including relict species such as the longhorn beetle Ropalopus ungaricus (Herbst, 1784). This endangered species is endemic to European mountain forests and is considered to be monophagous on living sycamore trees (Acer pseudoplatanus L.). Insufficient knowledge of the species ecology limits its effective conservation. Hence, to investigate its habitat requirements, 175 sycamore trees (87 occupied and 88 unoccupied by the species) were surveyed in the Hrubý Jeseník Mts. and Moravskoslezské Beskydy Mts. in northern Moravia (Czech Republic) in 2016. The species strongly preferred trees with reduced vitality, including variously damaged trees. The species was also documented to be much more abundant on sun-exposed trees, and the parts of the trunk mantle (south- and east-facing quarters) with the warmest microclimates were preferred. Surprisingly, trunk diameter seems to be an unimportant characteristic for this species (the diameters of occupied trees varied between 5 and 72 cm). In conclusion, R. ungaricus is a specialised species whose survival depends upon a continuous supply of sun-exposed declining and damaged sycamores in mountain forests. Based on the results of the present study, we suggest concrete conservation measures to support the species, and these will benefit other saproxylic species associated with the same habitat.
... The fauna of longhorn beetles on breaks of older trees was characterized by the species I. fuscum, the females of which laid eggs under scales of bark in May (Heyrovský, Sláma 1992). The species prefers standing dying trees and particularly thunderstruck trees with steamy phloem. ...
... Based on long-term studies, their higher proportion occurs on lying windfalls and large-diameter breaks-off, particularly at moist localities (Kula, Ząbecki 2006c). Although Heyrovský and Sláma (1992) reported them as rather a rare species in Bohemia, in the Moravian-Silesian Beskids and in the Beskid Zywiecki Mts. with salvage felling they create local large populations not only on breaks and breaks-off in young stands but also on windfalls and windbreaks in mature stands particularly at southern aspects (Kula, Ząbecki 2006c). ...
Article
In 25 to 40-years-old stands damaged by snow in the Beskids, the fauna of cambioxylophages was analyzed both on standing breaks and lying break-off stems. Breaks are characterized by the gradually drying phloem, watered phloem and secondary fauna (Hylurgops palliatus, Hylocoetes dermestoides, Dryocoetes sp., Monochamus sp.), which does not represent any danger to spruce stands. The phloem on lying breaks withered and died till the end of the growing season. The competing species Pityogenes chalcographus (L.) (46-52% cover) and species of the genus Dryocoetes (20% cover) colonized the breaks in particular. The upper and the lower side of the lying breaks-off differ in the intensity of attack and the degree of cover of these species. In young broken and open stands with the unprocessed wood of lying breaks-off there occurs a risk of the creation of bark beetle circles in the subsequent year after the damage.
... 6 ex., US;Obecnice, 29.VIII.2013, 1 ex., US;Padrť, 12.VIII.1987, 4 ex., US;"? / 6149, 6248, 6249, 6250, 6348, 6349, 6448, 6449, 6450" (Sláma 1998 (Heyrovský & Sláma 1992). Tetropium castaneum (Linnaeus, 1758) -Beran, 14.V.2017, 1 ex., HavJ;27.V.2017, 1 ex., HavJ;Kamenná, 730 m, 11.VI.2017, 1 ex., HavJ;Nepomuk, 8.VIII.1991, 4 ex., US;Valdek, 16.V.1992, 4 ex., US;Láz, 1.VII.2017, 1 ex., HJ;Padrť, 3.VII.2017, ...
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The Brdy Highlands Protected Landscape Area in Central Bohemia is one of the least studied regions in Central Europe from biological point of view. This was caused mainly by the fact that it served as a military training area between 1918 and 2017 and was closed for public. In the article, the authors summarise all available data on beetles (Coleoptera) recorded during the last houndred years. The data were collected mainly by the authors in the field, some were obtained from literature and private and museum collections. Five recent studies have been carried out with a special focus on beetle fauna. We collated more than 5.000 records and documented occurrence of 1.527 (182 species before 1959) beetle species from 69 families. The Brdy Highlands LPA has, however, still been understudied. The most endangered species, including 97 species from Redlist, inhabited old semi-natural forest fragments, wet meadows, peat bogs and heathlands. However, these habitats cover less than 10% of the area, the rest is formed mainly by species-poor Norway spruce plantations. The conservation activities supporting species-rich beetle communities and populations of rare beetle species must include (i) transformation of at least 25% of spruces plantations to broadleaved forests, (ii) significant enlargement of old-growth forest with standing snags and fallen dead-wood, (iii) avoidance of afforestation on open habitats mainly heathlands , marshlands, moorlands and peatbogs, (iv) avoidance of draining off both forest and open habitats, (v) disturbance management on open habitats including controlled fires, and (vi) introduction of large herbivore grazing.
... Sichrawa karpacka znana jest z nielicznych izolowanych stanowisk w Karpatach, z terenu Słowacji, Polski, Ukrainy i Rumunii (Panin, Săvulescu 1961;Starzyk 1970;Burakowski i in. 1990;Heyrovský, Sláma 1992;Sláma 1998;Danilevsky 2010). W Polsce notowana była z Beskidu Żywieckiego, Tatr, Pienin oraz z Beskidu Sądeckiego (Pawłowski 1967;Starzyk 1970Starzyk , 1992Śliwiński, Lessaer 1970;Burakowski i in. ...
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The longhorn beetle Pseudogaurotina excellens is a rare and endangered representative of the family Cerambycidae. It is endemic to the Carpathians, known only from isolated localities in Slovakia, Poland, Ukraine and Romania. So far there have been only a few reports on the presence of this species in the Tatra Mountains, the highest part of the Carpathian range. In 2015–2016, an extensive survey on the current occurrence of P. excellens in the Tatra National Park was conducted. Clusters of the host plant Lonicera nigra were carefully inspected in search of any trace of P. excellens. Pseudogaurotina excellens was found at 32 sites, at an altitude ranging from 940 to 1470 m a.s.l. Most of these sites were located on slopes with cold exposure (NW, N, NE and E). There were no P. excellens or larger L. nigra groups on slopes with warm exposure (S, SW). Among Natura 2000 habitats, P. excellens was most frequently found in acidophilous spruce forests of the montane to alpine levels (Vaccinio-Piceetea). The species was also quite frequently found in Luzulo-Fagetum beech forests, however, L. nigra groups without P. excellens were more common. Pseudogaurotina excellens was also found in alluvial forests with Alnus glutinosa and Fraxinus excelsior (Alno-Padion, Alnion incanae, Salicion albae) and in Alpine Pinus cembra forest. Imagines were observed at an altitude of 985–1100 m a.s.l. between the 8th and 21th of June. Forests of the Tatra National Park are the main refuge of Pseudogaurotina excellens in Poland, where the species is quite rare but occurs in almost every type of forest. Because of the short duration of imagines, the best way to monitor the population dynamics of this rare species is to conduct observations of feeding sites and larvae.
... Colonised trees can be easily identified by the typical oval exit holes that can reach up to 20 mm in their longer dimension. Adults are active at night from June to September with the highest abundance from July to mid-August. A. scabricorne ranges from the Caucasus and the Near East through the European portion of the Mediterranean area up to the southern part of Central Europe (Švácha and Danilevsky 1986; Heyrovský and Sláma 1992;Bense 1995;Sláma 1998), where it is mostly confined to lowland alluvial plains (Sláma 1998). The species occurs mainly in floodplain forests, pasture woodlands and old parks (Sláma 1998;Hardersen et al. 2012). ...
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Detailed knowledge of habitat requirements is an essential prerequisite for efficient conservation of any endangered species. Despite the grain support beetle Aegosoma scabricorne (Cerambycidae) being one of the largest European beetles, and an endangered, disappearing, species in Central Europe, its bionomics remain relatively poorly known. A. scabricorne is known as a polyphagous species on broadleaved trees; thus, to investigate its habitat preferences 174 broadleaved trees (87 occupied and 87 unoccupied by the species) were surveyed in the area of southern Moravia (Czech Republic) in 2015. The species was found to be strongly associated with declining or freshly dead trees that are, preferably, further damaged (breakage of stem or primary branch, hollows, etc.) and it particularly thrives on large trees (diameter >50 cm). Surprisingly, stem exposure to the sun was shown to be an unimportant characteristic for this species. However, in this study the number of exit holes was significantly smaller on the shaded north-facing quarter of the stem. Our results suggest concrete conservation measures to support the species. We also suggest that this species may be used as an umbrella species for saproxylic beetles of European lowland forests.
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An interesting record of the thermophilic species Calamobius filum (Rossi, 1790) in the Czech Republic is presented. The new locality, ca 5 km south of the town of Morayska Trebova, is relatively cold and lies near to Bohemia.
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