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Personality traits and emotional status affecting academic achievements of medical students: testifying mediating effect of learning strategies

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Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify possible causal relationships among personality traits, emotional status, learning strategies, and academic achievements of medical students and to testify mediating effect of learning strategies in these relationships. Methods: The study subjects are 424 medical students in the academic year of 2020 at the Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Korea. Using the Multi-dimensional Learning Strategy Test-II, we assessed the students' academic achievements with personality traits, emotional status, and learning strategies. This study employed Structural Equation Modelling to explore the causal relationships among the latent variables. Results: In the path model, personality traits directly affected academic achievements (β=0.285, p<0.05) and indirectly affected academic achievements via emotional status (β=0.063, p<0.01) and via learning strategies (β=0.244, p<0.05), respectively. Further, personality traits indirectly affected academic achievements via emotional status first and learning strategies next (β=0.019, p<0.05). Personality traits indirectly affected academic achievements through three multiple paths in the model (β=0.326, p<0.05). Learning strategies partially mediated the relationship between personality traits and academic achievements as well as the relationship between emotional status and academic achievements of medical students. Conclusion: Study findings proved constructing the causal relationships among personality traits, emotional status, learning strategies, and academic achievements of medical students, thus supporting our hypotheses. Early habits of self-regulated learning are essential for the successful academic achievements of medical students. Therefore, medical students should know how to regulate personality traits and control emotional status, significantly affecting learning strategies.

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