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Titanium dioxide nanotubes in a hydrogen peroxide-based bleaching agent: physicochemical properties and effectiveness of dental bleaching under the influence of a poliwave led light activation

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Abstract

Objectives The effects of different concentrations of titanium dioxide (TiO2) into 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) were evaluated as regards the effectiveness of dental color change either associated with activation by polywave LED light or not.Materials and methodsTiO2 (0, 1, 5, or 10%) was incorporated into HP to be applied during in-office bleaching (3 sessions/40 min each). Polywave LED light (Valo Corded/Ultradent) was applied or not in activation cycles of 15 s (total time of 2 min). The color of 80 third molars separated into groups according to TiO2 concentration and light activation (n = 10) was evaluated at baseline and at time intervals after the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd bleaching sessions.ResultsWID value was significantly higher when using HP with 5% TiO2 in the 2nd session than the values in the other groups (p < 0.05). After the 2nd and 3rd sessions, the ΔEab value was significantly higher when activated with light (p < 0.05) for all agents containing TiO2 or not. Zeta potential and pH of the agents were not modified by incorporating TiO2 at the different concentrations.Conclusions The 5% TiO2 in the bleaching agent could enhance tooth bleaching, even without light application. Association with polywave LED light potentiated the color change, irrespective of the presence of TiO2 in the bleaching gel.Clinical significanceHP with 5% TiO2 could lead to a greater tooth bleaching response in the 2nd clinical session, as well as the polywave light can enhance color change.
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Clinical Oral Investigations
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-022-04802-5
RESEARCH
Titanium dioxide nanotubes inahydrogen peroxide‑based bleaching
agent: physicochemical properties andeffectiveness ofdental
bleaching undertheinfluence ofapoliwave led light activation
EdinaVelosoGonçalvesAntunes1· RosannaTarkanyBasting1· FláviaLucisanoBotelhodoAmaral1·
FabianaMantovaniGomesFrança1· CeciliaPedrosoTurssi1· KamilaRosamiliaKantovitz1·
ErikaSoaresBronze‑Uhle2· PauloNoronhaLisboaFilho2· RobertaTarkanyBasting1
Received: 23 April 2022 / Accepted: 22 November 2022
© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2022
Abstract
Objectives The effects of different concentrations of titanium dioxide (TiO2) into 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) were evalu-
ated as regards the effectiveness of dental color change either associated with activation by polywave LED light or not.
Materials and methods TiO2 (0, 1, 5, or 10%) was incorporated into HP to be applied during in-office bleaching (3 ses-
sions/40min each). Polywave LED light (Valo Corded/Ultradent) was applied or not in activation cycles of 15s (total time
of 2min). The color of 80 third molars separated into groups according to TiO2 concentration and light activation (n = 10)
was evaluated at baseline and at time intervals after the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd bleaching sessions.
Results WID value was significantly higher when using HP with 5% TiO2 in the 2nd session than the values in the other groups
(p < 0.05). After the 2nd and 3rd sessions, the ΔEab value was significantly higher when activated with light (p < 0.05) for all agents
containing TiO2 or not. Zeta potential and pH of the agents were not modified by incorporating TiO2 at the different concentrations.
Conclusions The 5% TiO2 in the bleaching agent could enhance tooth bleaching, even without light application. Association
with polywave LED light potentiated the color change, irrespective of the presence of TiO2 in the bleaching gel.
Clinical significance HP with 5% TiO2 could lead to a greater tooth bleaching response in the 2nd clinical session, as well
as the polywave light can enhance color change.
Keywords Dental bleaching· Titanium dioxide· Hydrogen peroxide· Poliwave LED light
Introduction
Smile esthetics has been desired by patients, and dental
procedures need to provide the natural characteristics
of the teeth, reproducing the shape and esthetics in a
harmonious and beautiful way [1, 2]. From this aspect,
the color of the teeth can be changed with the use of den-
tal bleaching techniques, which are performed under the
supervision of the dentist, using trays (used at home by the
patient with the low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide
* Roberta Tarkany Basting
rbasting@yahoo.com
Edina Veloso Gonçalves Antunes
dra.edinaveloso2@hotmail.com
Rosanna Tarkany Basting
rosannatb@gmail.com
Flávia Lucisano Botelho do Amaral
flbamaral@gmail.com
Fabiana Mantovani Gomes França
biagomes@yahoo.com
Cecilia Pedroso Turssi
cecilia.turssi@gmail.com
Kamila Rosamilia Kantovitz
kamilark@yahoo.com.br
Erika Soares Bronze-Uhle
eriuhle@fc.unesp.br
Paulo Noronha Lisboa Filho
paulo.lisboa@unesp.br
1 Faculdade São Leopoldo Mandic, Rua José Rocha Junqueira
13, Bairro Swift, Campinas, SãoPauloCEP:13045-755,
Brazil
2 School ofSciences, São Paulo State University (UNESP),
Av. Eng. Luís Edmundo Carrijo Coube, 2085, Nucleo
Res. Pres. Geisel, Bauru, SãoPauloCEP:17033-360, Brazil
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