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Dataset: Coleoptera (Insecta) Collected from Beer Traps in “Smolny” National Park (Russia)

Authors:
  • Государственный природный заповедник "Присурский"

Abstract

Monitoring Coleoptera diversity in protected areas is part of the global ecological monitoring of the state of ecosystems. The purpose of this research is to describe the biodiversity of Coleoptera studied with the help of baits based on fermented substrate in the European part of Russia (Smolny National Park). The research was conducted April–August 2018–2022. Samples were collected in traps of our own design. Beer or wine with the addition of sugar, honey, or jam was used for bait. A total of 194 traps were installed. The dataset contains 1254 occurrences. A total of 9226 Coleoptera specimens have been studied. The dataset contains information about 134 species from 24 Coleoptera families. The largest number of species that have been found in traps belongs to the family Cerambycidae (30 species), Nitidulidae (14 species), Elateridae (12 species), and Curculionidae and Coccinellidae (10 species each). The number of individuals in the traps of these families was distributed as follows: Cerambycidae—1018 specimens; Nitidulidae—5359; Staphylinidae—241; Elateridae—33; Curculionidae—148; and Coccinellidae—19. The 10 dominant species accounted for 90.7% of all detected specimens in the traps. The maximum species diversity and abundance of Coleoptera was obtained in 2021. With the installation of the largest number of traps in 2022 and more diverse biotopes (64 traps), a smaller number of species was caught compared to 2021. New populations of such species have been found from rare Coleoptera: Calosoma sycophanta, Elater ferrugineus, Osmoderma barnabita, Protaetia speciosissima, and Protaetia fieberi.
Citation: Ruchin, A.B.; Egorov, L.V.;
Artaev, O.N.; Esin, M.N. Dataset:
Coleoptera (Insecta) Collected from
Beer Traps in “Smolny” National
Park (Russia). Data 2022,7, 161.
https://doi.org/10.3390/
data7110161
Academic Editor: Ross Mounce
Received: 15 October 2022
Accepted: 14 November 2022
Published: 15 November 2022
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4.0/).
data
Data Descriptor
Dataset: Coleoptera (Insecta) Collected from Beer Traps in
“Smolny” National Park (Russia)
Alexander B. Ruchin 1, * , Leonid V. Egorov 2, Oleg N. Artaev 3and Mikhail N. Esin 1
1
Joint Directorate of the Mordovia State Nature Reserve and National Park “Smolny”, 430005 Saransk, Russia
2Prisursky State Nature Reserve, 428034 Cheboksary, Russia
3Papanin Institute for Biology of Inland Waters, Russian Academy of Sciences, 152742 Borok, Russia
*Correspondence: ruchin.alexander@gmail.com; Tel.: +7-83445-296-35
Abstract:
Monitoring Coleoptera diversity in protected areas is part of the global ecological mon-
itoring of the state of ecosystems. The purpose of this research is to describe the biodiversity of
Coleoptera studied with the help of baits based on fermented substrate in the European part of
Russia (Smolny National Park). The research was conducted April–August 2018–2022. Samples were
collected in traps of our own design. Beer or wine with the addition of sugar, honey, or jam was used
for bait. A total of 194 traps were installed. The dataset contains 1254 occurrences. A total of 9226
Coleoptera specimens have been studied. The dataset contains information about 134 species from
24 Coleoptera families. The largest number of species that have been found in traps belongs to the
family Cerambycidae (30 species), Nitidulidae (14 species), Elateridae (12 species), and Curculionidae
and Coccinellidae (10 species each). The number of individuals in the traps of these families was
distributed as follows: Cerambycidae—1018 specimens; Nitidulidae—5359; Staphylinidae—241;
Elateridae—33; Curculionidae—148; and Coccinellidae—19. The 10 dominant species accounted
for 90.7% of all detected specimens in the traps. The maximum species diversity and abundance
of Coleoptera was obtained in 2021. With the installation of the largest number of traps in 2022
and more diverse biotopes (64 traps), a smaller number of species was caught compared to 2021.
New populations of such species have been found from rare Coleoptera: Calosoma sycophanta,Elater
ferrugineus,Osmoderma barnabita,Protaetia speciosissima, and Protaetia fieberi.
Dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/uv5qbr.
Dataset License: Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License
Keywords:
dataset; Cerambycidae; Coccinellidae; Coleoptera; Curculionidae; Elateridae; Nitidulidae;
occurrences; rare species; Republic of Mordovia
1. Summary
Bait traps are relatively simple sampling methods. These methods for attracting
insects are quite easy to perform and very effective in terms of the amount of data obtained
compared to the time spent [
1
]. In recent years, the attraction of insects with baits based on
the fermentation of beer, vinegar, and wine with the addition of molasses, sugar, honey,
molasses, and other sweet substances, as well as fruits, has been actively used. This
method is based on the attractiveness of a bait (for example, a food source simulating
fermented juice) poured into a jar, plastic bottle, or plastic cylindrical container [
2
6
].
The fermentation used to attract and act as pheromone traps often consists of rotten fruit
mixed with beer and brown sugar [
7
]. Many insects have receptors that perceive a variety
of carbohydrates, primarily sugar [
8
]. Sugar plays an important role in insect life as a
valuable food resource [
9
]. Additionally, during fermentation, many other volatile organic
substances are released, which can also attract insects [
10
]. For example, volatile substances
Data 2022,7, 161. https://doi.org/10.3390/data7110161 https://www.mdpi.com/journal/data
Data 2022,7, 161 2 of 8
from yeast fermentation, such as ethanol, attract beetles because chemicals can be a signal
of the presence of food sources, such as sugar and/or ethanol. During fermentation, yeast
secretes metabolites that are potential food sources for insects [11].
The traps with the process of active fermentation of sugars attract a variety of in-
sect groups; for example, Lepidoptera [
12
,
13
], Hymenoptera [
14
16
], Neuroptera [
17
], or
Diptera [
18
20
]. At the same time, such traps are most actively used to study the biodiver-
sity of Coleoptera, as well as to study the distribution in the space of forest ecosystems of
individuals and species of this group of insects [
4
,
5
,
21
,
22
]. Since different species appear in
traps in different habitats, they can be placed in open woodlands, on the edges, at different
heights [
22
24
]. Traps with baits are convenient to place and use in protected areas, since
the maintenance of such traps is easier in these areas, which people visit rarely, and the
risk of vandalism is reduced. In addition, the species diversity and abundance of insects in
protected areas are usually much higher than adjacent territories [
25
33
], which affects the
effectiveness of such traps for full-scale faunal studies.
The purpose of this work is to describe a set of present data on the use of bait traps for
studying Coleoptera biodiversity in “Smolny” National Park, recently published in GBIF
as the Darwin Core Archive [34].
2. Data Description
2.1. Data Set Name
Each observation includes information such as the location (latitude/longitude), the
date of observation, the symbol of the trap, the exposure time of the trap (the number of
days that the trap was set), the species composition of Coleoptera in this trap, and the name
of the observer. The coordinates were determined on the spot using a GPS device or after
research using Google Maps (Table 1). A total of 9226 specimens were studied.
Table 1. Description of the data in the dataset.
Column Label Column Description
eventID An identifier for the set of information associated with an Event (occurs in one place in one time).
occurrenceID An identifier for the Occurrence (as opposed to a particular digital record of the occurrence).
basisOfRecord The specific nature of the data record: HumanObservation
scientificName
The full scientific name including the genus name and the lowest level oftaxonomic rank with the authority
kingdom The full scientific name of the kingdom in which the taxon is classified
taxonRank The taxonomic rank of the most specific name in the scientificName.
decimalLatitude The geographic latitude of location in decimal degree
decimalLongitude The geographic longitude of location in decimal degrees
geodeticDatum The ellipsoid, geodetic datum, or spatial reference system (SRS) upon which the geographic coordinates
given in decimalLatitude and decimalLongitude as based.
country The name of the country in which the Location occurs
countryCode The standard code for the country in which the Location occurs.
individualCount The number of individuals represented present at the time of the Occurrence.
eventDate The date when material from the trap was collected or the range of dates during which the trap
collected material
year The integer day of the month on which the Event occurred.
month The ordinal month in which the Event occurred.
day The integer day of the month on which the Event occurred
samplingProtocol The names of, references to, or descriptions of the methods or protocols used during an Event.
sampleSizeValue A numeric value for a measurement of the size (time duration, length, area, or volume) of a sample in a
sampling event.
sampleSizeUnit
The unit of measurement of the size (time duration, length, area, or volume) of a sample in a sampling event.
samplingEffort The amount of effort expended during an Event.
recordedBy A person, group, or organization responsible for recording the original Occurrence.
identifiedBy A list of names of people who assigned the Taxon to the subject
Data 2022,7, 161 3 of 8
2.2. Figures, Tables and Schemes
The dataset presents data on 134 Coleoptera species from 24 families studied in the
course of our research (Figure 1). The largest number of species that has been found
in traps belongs to the families Cerambycidae (30 species), Nitidulidae (14 species), Ela-
teridae (12 species) and Curculionidae and Coccinellidae (10 species each). At the same
time, many families were represented in traps by only 1–2 species (Scirtidae, Buprestidae,
Cleridae, Monotomidae, Laemophloeidae, Oedemeridae, Scraptiidae, Chrysomelidae and
Anthribidae). Despite the significant species diversity of Cerambycidae, the number of
this family in traps was insignificant (only 1018 specimens). Other families with large
species diversity (Elateridae, Curculionidae, Coccinellidae, and Staphylinidae) were also
represented by a small number of specimens: respectively, 33, 148, 19 and 241. At the same
time, the number of individuals of the Nitidulidae family was the largest and amounted to
5359 (58.1% of the total number of individuals of all species).
Data 2022, 7, x FOR PEER REVIEW 3 of 9
samplingProtocol The names of, references to, or descriptions of the methods or protocols used during an
Event.
sampleSizeValue A numeric value for a measurement of the size (time duration, length, area, or volume)
of a sample in a sampling event.
sampleSizeUnit The unit of measurement of the size (time duration, length, area, or volume) of a sample
in a sampling event.
samplingEffort The amount of effort expended during an Event.
recordedBy A person, group, or organization responsible for recording the original Occurrence.
identifiedBy A list of names of people who assigned the Taxon to the subject
2.2. Figures, Tables and Schemes
The dataset presents data on 134 Coleoptera species from 24 families studied in the
course of our research (Figure 1). The largest number of species that has been found in
traps belongs to the families Cerambycidae (30 species), Nitidulidae (14 species), Elateri-
dae (12 species) and Curculionidae and Coccinellidae (10 species each). At the same time,
many families were represented in traps by only 1–2 species (Scirtidae, Buprestidae, Cler-
idae, Monotomidae, Laemophloeidae, Oedemeridae, Scraptiidae, Chrysomelidae and An-
thribidae). Despite the significant species diversity of Cerambycidae, the number of this
family in traps was insignificant (only 1018 specimens). Other families with large species
diversity (Elateridae, Curculionidae, Coccinellidae, and Staphylinidae) were also repre-
sented by a small number of specimens: respectively, 33, 148, 19 and 241. At the same
time, the number of individuals of the Nitidulidae family was the largest and amounted
to 5359 (58.1% of the total number of individuals of all species).
Figure 1. The number of specimens and biodiversity of Coleoptera families represented in beer traps
in Smolny National Park (total data for 2018–2022).
Glischrochilus grandis (Tournier, 1872) (Nitidulidae), Protaetia marmorata (Fabricius,
1792) (Scarabaeidae), Cryptarcha strigata (Fabricius, 1787) (Nitidulidae), Soronia grisea (Lin-
naeus, 1758) (Nitidulidae), Leptura thoracica Creutzer, 1799 (Cerambycidae), Leptura quad-
Figure 1.
The number of specimens and biodiversity of Coleoptera families represented in beer traps
in Smolny National Park (total data for 2018–2022).
Glischrochilus grandis (Tournier, 1872) (Nitidulidae), Protaetia marmorata (Fabricius,
1792) (Scarabaeidae), Cryptarcha strigata (Fabricius, 1787) (Nitidulidae), Soronia grisea (Lin-
naeus, 1758) (Nitidulidae), Leptura thoracica Creutzer, 1799 (Cerambycidae), Leptura quadri-
fasciata Linnaeus, 1758 (Cerambycidae), Quedius dilatatus (Fabricius, 1787) (Staphylinidae),
Rhagium mordax (DeGeer, 1775) (Cerambycidae), Glischrochilus hortensis (Geoffroy, 1785)
(Nitidulidae) and Protaetia fieberi (Kraatz, 1880) (Scarabaeidae) were the dominant species
in beer traps for 2018–2022 (Figure 2). In total, they accounted for 90.7% of all collected
instances. This is a conditional allocation of species whose numerical abundance and occur-
rence were the greatest in five-year studies. Glischrochilus grandis was the most numerous
species (35.2% of the total) and the third most common species (52.1%). Protaetia marmorata
in traps was second in number (23.2%) and first in occurrence (80.4%). Cryptarcha strigata
was third in number in 5 years of research (13.2%) and was second in occurrence (69.1%).
Thus, most species were rarely found in traps (no more than 8% of the number of traps)
with a small number of individuals (no more than 1% of the total number of individuals).
Data 2022,7, 161 4 of 8
Data 2022, 7, x FOR PEER REVIEW 4 of 9
rifasciata Linnaeus, 1758 (Cerambycidae), Quedius dilatatus (Fabricius, 1787) (Staphylini-
dae), Rhagium mordax (DeGeer, 1775) (Cerambycidae), Glischrochilus hortensis (Geoffroy,
1785) (Nitidulidae) and Protaetia fieberi (Kraatz, 1880) (Scarabaeidae) were the dominant
species in beer traps for 2018–2022 (Figure 2). In total, they accounted for 90.7% of all col-
lected instances. This is a conditional allocation of species whose numerical abundance
and occurrence were the greatest in five-year studies. Glischrochilus grandis was the most
numerous species (35.2% of the total) and the third most common species (52.1%). Protaetia
marmorata in traps was second in number (23.2%) and first in occurrence (80.4%). Cryptar-
cha strigata was third in number in 5 years of research (13.2%) and was second in occur-
rence (69.1%). Thus, most species were rarely found in traps (no more than 8% of the num-
ber of traps) with a small number of individuals (no more than 1% of the total number of
individuals).
Figure 2. Coleoptera species, dominating in numbers in beer traps.
The maximum species diversity and abundance of Coleoptera was obtained in 2021.
At the same time, when installing the largest number of traps in 2022 and in more diverse
biotopes (64 traps), a smaller number of species was caught compared to 2021. As studies
have shown (Figure 3), an increase in the number of traps in each subsequent year of the
study has a certain effect on the identification of species new to the fauna, but up to a
certain limit. We described a similar example above when comparing 2021 and 2022. Pre-
viously [35], it was indicated that in the fourth year of research in the Mordovia State
Nature Reserve, the number of new species not previously caught decreased by five times
(the number of trap exposures decreased only 2.6 times). Previously [36], it was suggested
that two-year studies would be sufficient to study the biodiversity of a certain biotope, a
limited forest area or a small region. For the best study of biodiversity, it is desirable not
only to increase the number of traps from year to year or to place them in large numbers
annually, but also to diversify the collection sites of samples.
Figure 2. Coleoptera species, dominating in numbers in beer traps.
The maximum species diversity and abundance of Coleoptera was obtained in 2021.
At the same time, when installing the largest number of traps in 2022 and in more diverse
biotopes (64 traps), a smaller number of species was caught compared to 2021. As studies
have shown (Figure 3), an increase in the number of traps in each subsequent year of
the study has a certain effect on the identification of species new to the fauna, but up to
a certain limit. We described a similar example above when comparing 2021 and 2022.
Previously [
35
], it was indicated that in the fourth year of research in the Mordovia State
Nature Reserve, the number of new species not previously caught decreased by five times
(the number of trap exposures decreased only 2.6 times). Previously [
36
], it was suggested
that two-year studies would be sufficient to study the biodiversity of a certain biotope, a
limited forest area or a small region. For the best study of biodiversity, it is desirable not
only to increase the number of traps from year to year or to place them in large numbers
annually, but also to diversify the collection sites of samples.
The very rare species included in the Red Data Book of the Russian Federation [
37
]
must be also noted. The following species were found in our studies: Calosoma sycophanta
(Linnaeus, 1758), Elater ferrugineus Linnaeus, 1758, Osmoderma barnabita Motschulsky, 1845,
Protaetia speciosissima (Scopoli, 1786) and Protaetia fieberi. If the first species is clearly a
random find, then the remaining species are actively attracted with the help of beer traps.
It should be noted that Osmoderma barnabita and Elater ferrugineus have not been previously
recorded in “Smolny” National Park, and only with the help of beer traps was it possible to
find populations of these species.
Data 2022,7, 161 5 of 8
Data 2022, 7, x FOR PEER REVIEW 5 of 9
Figure 3. The dependence of the number of species caught on the number of traps by year in the
“Smolny” National Park.
The very rare species included in the Red Data Book of the Russian Federation [37]
must be also noted. The following species were found in our studies: Calosoma sycophanta
(Linnaeus, 1758), Elater ferrugineus Linnaeus, 1758, Osmoderma barnabita Motschulsky,
1845, Protaetia speciosissima (Scopoli, 1786) and Protaetia fieberi. If the first species is clearly
a random find, then the remaining species are actively attracted with the help of beer
traps. It should be noted that Osmoderma barnabita and Elater ferrugineus have not been
previously recorded in “Smolny” National Park, and only with the help of beer traps was
it possible to find populations of these species.
3. Methods
3.1. Study Area
Smolny” National Park is located in the northeastern part of the Republic of Mor-
dovia between 45°04 and 45°37 E, 54°43 and 54°53 N (European Russia) (Figure 4). The
maximum length from west to east is 35 km; from north to south, it is 18 km. The area is
36,500 hectares. The park is located in landscapes of mixed forests on the left bank of the
Alatyr River (Volga River basin). The southern part of the park is a lower and flat area,
with wide watershed spaces. It occupies the hills to the north of the Alatyr River, as well
as small areas of the floodplain and almost all the near-red depressions. Here, the mini-
mum marks of the park are 95 m above sea level. The main territory has heights of 100
160 m above sea level. The northern part of the park is more elevated, with absolute marks
of 214217 m above sea level. There are a lot of ravines. The climate is moderately conti-
nental. The average annual air temperature is 4–3.5 °C; precipitation is 440550 mm. The
predominant soils are sod-podzolic. Vegetation is represented by forests dominated by
pine and birch. Pine forests predominate in the southern part and were planted after con-
tinuous logging at the end of the XX century. Birch trees also grow in the southern part.
Figure 3.
The dependence of the number of species caught on the number of traps by year in the
“Smolny” National Park.
3. Methods
3.1. Study Area
“Smolny” National Park is located in the northeastern part of the Republic of Mordovia
between 45
04
0
and 45
37
0
E, 54
43
0
and 54
53
0
N (European Russia) (Figure 4). The
maximum length from west to east is 35 km; from north to south, it is 18 km. The area
is 36,500 hectares. The park is located in landscapes of mixed forests on the left bank of
the Alatyr River (Volga River basin). The southern part of the park is a lower and flat
area, with wide watershed spaces. It occupies the hills to the north of the Alatyr River, as
well as small areas of the floodplain and almost all the near-red depressions. Here, the
minimum marks of the park are 95 m above sea level. The main territory has heights of
100–160 m above sea level. The northern part of the park is more elevated, with absolute
marks of 214–217 m above sea level. There are a lot of ravines. The climate is moderately
continental. The average annual air temperature is
4–3.5
C; precipitation is 440–550 mm.
The predominant soils are sod-podzolic. Vegetation is represented by forests dominated
by pine and birch. Pine forests predominate in the southern part and were planted after
continuous logging at the end of the XX century. Birch trees also grow in the southern part.
The northern part of the park is dominated by linden, oak, birch and aspen. These trees
grow on the site of deforestation and are secondary forests [38].
3.2. Design of Research, Identification and Taxonomic Position of Samples
Each trap was a large plastic 5-liter container with a window cut out in it on one side.
The distance from the bottom was 10 cm. With the help of a load, a rope with a tied trap
was thrown onto a tree branch at a height of 2 to 10 m from the soil surface. At a height
of 1.5 m, the trap was tied to a tree branch without special loads. Tripods were also used
Data 2022,7, 161 6 of 8
in open stations (meadows, clearings in the forest, clearings under power lines). A trap
there was suspended at a level of 1.5 m. Beer or dry wine with added sugar, honey or jam
was used as bait. Such a mixture was fermented for a day. Traps suggested by I. Jalas [
39
]
were also used; they were placed in the crowns of various trees at heights from 2 to 8 m.
Occurrence is the ratio of the number of samples in which a species (subspecies) is present
to the total number of samples, expressed in %. Exposure time is the period between the
hanging of the trap and the removal of the material for analysis, expressed in days. The
collected material was studied by L.V. Egorov.
Data 2022, 7, x FOR PEER REVIEW 6 of 9
The northern part of the park is dominated by linden, oak, birch and aspen. These trees
grow on the site of deforestation and are secondary forests [38].
Figure 4. Study area and the area of obtaining information for the dataset.
3.2. Design of Research, Identification and Taxonomic Position of Samples
Each trap was a large plastic 5-liter container with a window cut out in it on one side.
The distance from the bottom was 10 cm. With the help of a load, a rope with a tied trap
was thrown onto a tree branch at a height of 2 to 10 m from the soil surface. At a height of
1.5 m, the trap was tied to a tree branch without special loads. Tripods were also used in
open stations (meadows, clearings in the forest, clearings under power lines). A trap there
was suspended at a level of 1.5 m. Beer or dry wine with added sugar, honey or jam was
used as bait. Such a mixture was fermented for a day. Traps suggested by I. Jalas [39] were
also used; they were placed in the crowns of various trees at heights from 2 to 8 m. Occur-
rence is the ratio of the number of samples in which a species (subspecies) is present to
the total number of samples, expressed in %. Exposure time is the period between the
hanging of the trap and the removal of the material for analysis, expressed in days. The
collected material was studied by L.V. Egorov.
The classification of beetle families is given according to the publications [40,41]. At
the same time, we have taken into account changes in names from the Catalogue of Pal-
aearctic Coleoptera [4248], as well as for Cucujoidea from the publication of Robertson
et al. [49], for Curculionoidea—from the publication of Alonso-Zarazaga et al. [50]. To
clarify the nomenclature, the above publications were used, as well as the Catalogue of
Palaearctic Coleoptera [51,52]. The years of description of some beetle species are specified
according to Bousquet [53].
Author Contributions: Conceptualization, A.B.R.; methodology, A.B.R. and M.N.E.; software,
O.N.A.; validation, A.B.R.; formal analysis, A.B.R. and L.V.E.; investigation, A.B.R. and M.N.E.; re-
sources, A.B.R. and L.V.E.; data curation, O.N.A.; writing—original draft preparation, A.B.R. and
L.V.E.; writing—review and editing, L.V.E.; visualization, A.B.R.; supervision, A.B.R.; project ad-
ministration, A.B.R.; funding acquisition, A.B.R. All authors have read and agreed to the published
version of the manuscript.
Funding: This research was funded by Russian Science Foundation, grant number 22-14-00026.
Figure 4. Study area and the area of obtaining information for the dataset.
The classification of beetle families is given according to the publications [
40
,
41
]. At the
same time, we have taken into account changes in names from the Catalogue of Palaearctic
Coleoptera [
42
48
], as well as for Cucujoidea from the publication of Robertson et al. [
49
],
for Curculionoidea—from the publication of Alonso-Zarazaga et al. [
50
]. To clarify the
nomenclature, the above publications were used, as well as the Catalogue of Palaearctic
Coleoptera [
51
,
52
]. The years of description of some beetle species are specified according
to Bousquet [53].
Author Contributions:
Conceptualization, A.B.R.; methodology, A.B.R. and M.N.E.; software,
O.N.A.; validation, A.B.R.; formal analysis, A.B.R. and L.V.E.; investigation, A.B.R. and M.N.E.;
resources, A.B.R. and L.V.E.; data curation, O.N.A.; writing—original draft preparation, A.B.R. and
L.V.E.; writing—review and editing, L.V.E.; visualization, A.B.R.; supervision, A.B.R.; project adminis-
tration, A.B.R.; funding acquisition, A.B.R. All authors have read and agreed to the published version
of the manuscript.
Funding: This research was funded by Russian Science Foundation, grant number 22-14-00026.
Institutional Review Board Statement: Not applicable.
Informed Consent Statement: Not applicable.
Data Availability Statement:
Data are available from GBIF (https://doi.org/10.15468/uv5qbr)
under CC BY 4.0 license.
Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.
Data 2022,7, 161 7 of 8
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Reptiles are a common component of natural biological communities. They serve as the final and paratenic hosts of helminths and play an important role in the transmission of parasites. There are very few helminthological studies covering all species of reptiles from the same locality. This paper was aimed to study the species diversity of reptile helminths in the National Park «Smolny» (Russia). In 2018‒2020 we studied the helminth fauna of five reptile species by the method of complete helminthological dissection in 19 sites of the National Park «Smolny». A total of 27 species of parasites were noted in the studied species of snakes and lizards, including 14 trematodes, two cestodes and ten nematodes. We found the richest helminth fauna in Natrix natrix (17 species) and Lacerta agilis (11). The helminth fauna was less rich in Vipera berus (eight species) and Anguis fragilis (four species). We found only two species of helminths in Zootoca vivipara. Most of the parasites (16 species) are distributed through the Palaearctic. We found one species, the nematode Oswaldocruzia filiformis, in all five studied reptile species in the National Park «Smolny». The most widespread parasite species in reptiles was the nematode Rhabdias fuscovenosa, found in 12 out of 19 studied localities in the National Park «Smolny». We conducted a comparative analysis of the helminth fauna of reptiles in the National Park «Smolny» and reptiles from other areas of the Middle Volga Region, namely Mordovia State Nature Reserve, Samara Region and the National Park «Samarskaya Luka». It was found that the parasite composition of Anguis fragilis has a maximal similarity with the ones in other regions. The helminth fauna of Natrix natrix and Zootoca vivipara in the National Park «Smolny» is less similar to other compared areas of the Middle Volga Region. The least similarity of the helminth fauna with other studied regions was found for Vipera berus and Lacerta agilis. The similarity of the helminth fauna of certain reptile species from different areas of the Middle Volga Region is caused by the specificity of helminths, as well as the geographical proximity of the studied localities and the broad distribution of parasite species of reptiles. The nematode Agamospirura minuta, juv. in Natrix natrix, as well as in Vipera berus and Lacerta agilis were found for the first time in Russia, while the trematode Pleurogenoides medians was found for the first time in such a host as Lacerta agilis. We found for the first time the nematode larvae of Physocephalus sexalatus and Physaloptera clausa in Vipera berus in Russia. We revealed that Vipera berus and Lacerta agilis are new hosts for Physaloptera clausa, juv. and Oxysomatium brevicaudatum, respectively. We noted the cestode Spirometra erinaceieuropaei, plc. in reptiles (namely Natrix natrix) from the Middle Volga region for the first time. Three parasite species (cestode Spirometra erinaceieuropaei, trematode Alaria alata and nematode Physocephalus sexalatus) found in reptiles of the National Park «Smolny», have medical and veterinary value as causative agents of potential hazardous helminthiases.
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